Introduction: Depression is one of the most common comorbidities of type 2 diabetes. The relationship between these two diseases seems to be bidirectional. Both conditions separately lead to significant morbidity and mortality, including hospitalization. Moreover, depression is associated with non-persistence with antidiabetic drugs. Objectives: To measure the effect of depression on morbidity and particularly on all-cause, diabetes-related, cardiovascular-related and major cardiovascular events-related hospitalization, adjusting for non-persistence to antidiabetic drugs and other confounders. Methods: We performed a nested case-control study within a cohort of type 2 diabetic individuals initiating antidiabetic drugs. Using the health administrative data of the province of Quebec, Canada, we identified all-cause, diabetes-related, cardiovascular-related and major cardiovascular hospitalizations during a maximum follow-up of eight years after the initiation of antidiabetic drug treatment. A density sampling method matched all cases with up to 10 controls by age, sex, and the Elixhauser comorbidity index. The effect of depression on hospitalization was estimated using conditional logistic regressions adjusting for non-persistence to antidiabetic drug treatment and other variables. Results: We identified 41,550 all-cause hospitalized cases, of which 34,437 were related to cardiovascular (CV) diseases, 29,584 to diabetes, and 13,867 to major CV events. Depression was diagnosed in 2.51% of all-cause hospitalizations and 1.16% of matched controls. 69.11% of cases and 72.59% of controls were on metformin monotherapy. The majority (71.62% vs 75.02%, respectively) stayed on metformin monotherapy without adding or switching drugs during follow-up. Non-persistence was at similar rates (about 30%) in both groups. In the multivariable analyses, depression was associated with an increased risk for all-cause hospitalizations, with odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 2.21 (95% CI: 2.07–2.37) to 1.32 (95% CI: 1.22–1.44) according to the model adjustment (from the univariate to the fully adhjusted). Conclusion: Depression increased the risk of all-cause hospitalizations among patients treated for diabetes, even after accounting for non-persistence and other potentially confounding factors. These results stress the impact of depression on diabetic patients' use of health care resources.

Depression and the risk of hospitalization in type 2 diabetes patients: A nested case-control study accounting for non-persistence to antidiabetic treatment

Lunghi C.
Ultimo
2022

Abstract

Introduction: Depression is one of the most common comorbidities of type 2 diabetes. The relationship between these two diseases seems to be bidirectional. Both conditions separately lead to significant morbidity and mortality, including hospitalization. Moreover, depression is associated with non-persistence with antidiabetic drugs. Objectives: To measure the effect of depression on morbidity and particularly on all-cause, diabetes-related, cardiovascular-related and major cardiovascular events-related hospitalization, adjusting for non-persistence to antidiabetic drugs and other confounders. Methods: We performed a nested case-control study within a cohort of type 2 diabetic individuals initiating antidiabetic drugs. Using the health administrative data of the province of Quebec, Canada, we identified all-cause, diabetes-related, cardiovascular-related and major cardiovascular hospitalizations during a maximum follow-up of eight years after the initiation of antidiabetic drug treatment. A density sampling method matched all cases with up to 10 controls by age, sex, and the Elixhauser comorbidity index. The effect of depression on hospitalization was estimated using conditional logistic regressions adjusting for non-persistence to antidiabetic drug treatment and other variables. Results: We identified 41,550 all-cause hospitalized cases, of which 34,437 were related to cardiovascular (CV) diseases, 29,584 to diabetes, and 13,867 to major CV events. Depression was diagnosed in 2.51% of all-cause hospitalizations and 1.16% of matched controls. 69.11% of cases and 72.59% of controls were on metformin monotherapy. The majority (71.62% vs 75.02%, respectively) stayed on metformin monotherapy without adding or switching drugs during follow-up. Non-persistence was at similar rates (about 30%) in both groups. In the multivariable analyses, depression was associated with an increased risk for all-cause hospitalizations, with odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 2.21 (95% CI: 2.07–2.37) to 1.32 (95% CI: 1.22–1.44) according to the model adjustment (from the univariate to the fully adhjusted). Conclusion: Depression increased the risk of all-cause hospitalizations among patients treated for diabetes, even after accounting for non-persistence and other potentially confounding factors. These results stress the impact of depression on diabetic patients' use of health care resources.
2022
Tardif I.; Guenette L.; Zongo A.; Demers E.; Lunghi C.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/884397
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