Opioids are considered the oldest drugs known by humans and have been used for sedation and pain relief for several centuries. Nowadays, endogenous opioid peptides are divided into four families: enkephalins, dynorphins, endorphins, and nociceptin/orphanin FQ. They exert their action through the opioid receptors (ORs), transmembrane proteins belonging to the super-family of G-protein-coupled receptors, and are expressed throughout the body; the receptors are the δ opioid receptor (DOR), µ opioid receptor (MOR), κ opioid receptor (KOR), and nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor (NOP). Endogenous opioids are mainly studied in the central nervous system (CNS), but their role has been investigated in other organs, both in physiological and in pathological conditions. Here, we revise their role in stem cell (SC) biology, since these cells are a subject of great scientific interest due to their peculiar features and their involvement in cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. In particular, we focus on endogenous opioids’ ability to modulate SC proliferation, stress response (to oxidative stress, starvation, or damage following ischemia–reperfusion), and differentiation towards different lineages, such as neurogenesis, vasculogenesis, and cardiogenesis.

Endogenous Opioids and Their Role in Stem Cell Biology and Tissue Rescue

Petrocelli G.;Pampanella L.;Abruzzo P. M.;Ventura C.
;
Canaider S.
;
Facchin F.
2022

Abstract

Opioids are considered the oldest drugs known by humans and have been used for sedation and pain relief for several centuries. Nowadays, endogenous opioid peptides are divided into four families: enkephalins, dynorphins, endorphins, and nociceptin/orphanin FQ. They exert their action through the opioid receptors (ORs), transmembrane proteins belonging to the super-family of G-protein-coupled receptors, and are expressed throughout the body; the receptors are the δ opioid receptor (DOR), µ opioid receptor (MOR), κ opioid receptor (KOR), and nociceptin/orphanin FQ receptor (NOP). Endogenous opioids are mainly studied in the central nervous system (CNS), but their role has been investigated in other organs, both in physiological and in pathological conditions. Here, we revise their role in stem cell (SC) biology, since these cells are a subject of great scientific interest due to their peculiar features and their involvement in cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. In particular, we focus on endogenous opioids’ ability to modulate SC proliferation, stress response (to oxidative stress, starvation, or damage following ischemia–reperfusion), and differentiation towards different lineages, such as neurogenesis, vasculogenesis, and cardiogenesis.
Petrocelli G.; Pampanella L.; Abruzzo P.M.; Ventura C.; Canaider S.; Facchin F.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/882661
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