Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is an economically important pathogen for poultry, whereas knowledge of its occurrence in non-poultry hosts is limited. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to summarize the up-to-date knowledge about the sero-viroprevalence of IBDV in wild birds on a global scale. A computerized literature research was performed on PubMed, Scopus, CAB Direct and Web of Science to find relevant publications, along with the screening of reference lists. Journal articles, book chapters, scientific correspondences, conference proceedings and short communications on IBDV virological and/or serological surveys in free-living wild birds published between 1970 and 2021 were considered as eligible. Among 184 studies found, 36 original contributions met the pre-established criteria. A random-effect model was applied to calculate pooled seroprevalence estimates with 95% confidence intervals, whereas the paucity of virological studies (n = 6) only allowed a qualitative description of the data. The pooled seroprevalence was estimated to be 6% (95% CI: 3%–9%) and a high heterogeneity was detected (I2= 96%). Sub-group analyses were not performed due to the scarcity of available information about hypothetical moderators. With respect to virological studies, IBDV was detected in Anseriformes, Columbiformes, Galliformes, Passeriformes and Pelecaniformes and different strains related to poultry infection were isolated. Our estimates of serological data showed a moderate exposure of wild birds to IBDV. The susceptibility of different species to IBDV infection underlines their potential role in its epidemiology at least as carriers or spreaders. Indeed, the isolation of IBDV in healthy wild birds with a migratory attitude might contribute to a long-distance spread of the virus and to strain diversity. While a wild reservoir host could not be clearly identified, we believe our work provides useful insights for conducting future surveys which are needed to broaden our knowledge of IBDV occurrence in wild birds.

Infectious bursal disease virus in free-living wild birds: A systematic review and meta-analysis of its sero-viroprevalence on a global scale

Graziosi G.
Primo
;
Catelli E.
Secondo
;
Lupini C.
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) is an economically important pathogen for poultry, whereas knowledge of its occurrence in non-poultry hosts is limited. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to summarize the up-to-date knowledge about the sero-viroprevalence of IBDV in wild birds on a global scale. A computerized literature research was performed on PubMed, Scopus, CAB Direct and Web of Science to find relevant publications, along with the screening of reference lists. Journal articles, book chapters, scientific correspondences, conference proceedings and short communications on IBDV virological and/or serological surveys in free-living wild birds published between 1970 and 2021 were considered as eligible. Among 184 studies found, 36 original contributions met the pre-established criteria. A random-effect model was applied to calculate pooled seroprevalence estimates with 95% confidence intervals, whereas the paucity of virological studies (n = 6) only allowed a qualitative description of the data. The pooled seroprevalence was estimated to be 6% (95% CI: 3%–9%) and a high heterogeneity was detected (I2= 96%). Sub-group analyses were not performed due to the scarcity of available information about hypothetical moderators. With respect to virological studies, IBDV was detected in Anseriformes, Columbiformes, Galliformes, Passeriformes and Pelecaniformes and different strains related to poultry infection were isolated. Our estimates of serological data showed a moderate exposure of wild birds to IBDV. The susceptibility of different species to IBDV infection underlines their potential role in its epidemiology at least as carriers or spreaders. Indeed, the isolation of IBDV in healthy wild birds with a migratory attitude might contribute to a long-distance spread of the virus and to strain diversity. While a wild reservoir host could not be clearly identified, we believe our work provides useful insights for conducting future surveys which are needed to broaden our knowledge of IBDV occurrence in wild birds.
Graziosi G.; Catelli E.; Fanelli A.; Lupini C.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/872921
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