Introduction: The objective of this randomized controlled study was to demonstrate whether acoustic stimulation in utero is associated with fetal reactivity which is documentable by car-diotocography. Materials and methods: A monocentric randomized controlled trial was performed at a single university tertiary hospital between September 2016 and July 2017. This study was registered as a randomized clinical trial on clinicaltrail.gov (registration number NCT04622059). Unselected pregnancies at term of gestation were consecutively recruited for the purpose of this study. After 10 min of normal cardiotocography without accelerations (non-stress-test with a basal frequency between 110 and 150 beats/min, normal variability between 6 and 15 b/min, no accelerations, and no fetal movements), fetuses were randomized at a 1:1 ratio to either of the two groups. Fetuses in group A (n = 105) received acoustic stimulation after 10 min from the beginning of the CTG, whereas fetuses in group B received no stimulation (n = 105). The outcome variables investigated were the lapse of time between the beginning of the CTG and the occurrence of the first accelera-tion, and the lapse of time between the beginning of the CTG and the first fetal movement noticed. Results: The lapse of time between the beginning of the CTG and the occurrence of the first acceleration was significantly shorter in the group with acoustic stimulation compared to the other group (14.87 ± 5.01 vs. 21.90 ± 6.94 min, p-value < 0.001 log-rank test). Similarly, the lapse of time between the beginning of the CTG and the occurrence of the first fetal movement was significantly shorter in group A compared to group B (17.77 ± 7.62 vs. 23.28 ± 7.61 min, p-value < 0.001, log-rank test). Fetal cardiac acceleration and the occurrence of a fetal movement during the first 20 min of the CTG were more frequently recorded in group A compared to group B (respectively, 15% vs. 5% and 20% vs. 8%). Conclusion: This RCT showed an early fetal reaction following auditive stimulus, documentable by cardiotocography. Further research is needed to investigate a possible role of acoustic stimulation in utero for the prenatal diagnosis of congenital hypoacusis.

Larcher L., Farina A., Morano D., Rimondi N., Leccese V., Contro E. (2021). Auditive direct in utero observation (Audio): A randomized controlled trial for a prenatal demonstration of fetal hearing. DIAGNOSTICS, 11(11), 2026-2033 [10.3390/diagnostics11112026].

Auditive direct in utero observation (Audio): A randomized controlled trial for a prenatal demonstration of fetal hearing

Larcher L.
Primo
;
Farina A.
Secondo
;
Morano D.
;
Rimondi N.
;
Leccese V.
;
Contro E.
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Introduction: The objective of this randomized controlled study was to demonstrate whether acoustic stimulation in utero is associated with fetal reactivity which is documentable by car-diotocography. Materials and methods: A monocentric randomized controlled trial was performed at a single university tertiary hospital between September 2016 and July 2017. This study was registered as a randomized clinical trial on clinicaltrail.gov (registration number NCT04622059). Unselected pregnancies at term of gestation were consecutively recruited for the purpose of this study. After 10 min of normal cardiotocography without accelerations (non-stress-test with a basal frequency between 110 and 150 beats/min, normal variability between 6 and 15 b/min, no accelerations, and no fetal movements), fetuses were randomized at a 1:1 ratio to either of the two groups. Fetuses in group A (n = 105) received acoustic stimulation after 10 min from the beginning of the CTG, whereas fetuses in group B received no stimulation (n = 105). The outcome variables investigated were the lapse of time between the beginning of the CTG and the occurrence of the first accelera-tion, and the lapse of time between the beginning of the CTG and the first fetal movement noticed. Results: The lapse of time between the beginning of the CTG and the occurrence of the first acceleration was significantly shorter in the group with acoustic stimulation compared to the other group (14.87 ± 5.01 vs. 21.90 ± 6.94 min, p-value < 0.001 log-rank test). Similarly, the lapse of time between the beginning of the CTG and the occurrence of the first fetal movement was significantly shorter in group A compared to group B (17.77 ± 7.62 vs. 23.28 ± 7.61 min, p-value < 0.001, log-rank test). Fetal cardiac acceleration and the occurrence of a fetal movement during the first 20 min of the CTG were more frequently recorded in group A compared to group B (respectively, 15% vs. 5% and 20% vs. 8%). Conclusion: This RCT showed an early fetal reaction following auditive stimulus, documentable by cardiotocography. Further research is needed to investigate a possible role of acoustic stimulation in utero for the prenatal diagnosis of congenital hypoacusis.
2021
Larcher L., Farina A., Morano D., Rimondi N., Leccese V., Contro E. (2021). Auditive direct in utero observation (Audio): A randomized controlled trial for a prenatal demonstration of fetal hearing. DIAGNOSTICS, 11(11), 2026-2033 [10.3390/diagnostics11112026].
Larcher L.; Farina A.; Morano D.; Rimondi N.; Leccese V.; Contro E.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/869675
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