Introduction: The canonical isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 R132 mutation (IDH1 R132) is the most frequent mutation among IDH-mutated gliomas. Non-canonical IDH1 mutations or IDH2 mutations are unusual and their clinical and biological role is still unclear. Methods: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the clinical role of IDH non-canonical mutations. Results: Overall, we selected 13 of 3513 studies reporting data of 4007 patients with a diagnosis of grade 2 and grade 3 glioma including 3091 patients with a molecularly proven IDH1 or IDH2 mutation. Patients with non-canonical IDH1 mutations were younger and presented a higher DNA methylation level as compared to those with canonical IDH1 R132H alteration. The overall incidence of non-canonical IDH1 mutations was 7.9% (95% CI 5.4-10.7%) in patients with IDH-mutated gliomas. There was no statistical difference in terms of incidence between patients with grade 2 or grade 3 glioma. Patients with non-canonical IDH mutations had a lower rate of 1p19q codeletion (risk difference 31%, 95% CI 23-38%) and presented a significantly prolonged survival (pooled HR 0.47, 95% CI 0.28-0.81) as compared to those with IDH1 R132H mutation. Conclusion: Non-canonical IDH1 mutations occur in 7.9% of IDH-mutated gliomas and identify a specific subgroup of patients with an improved survival despite a lower rate of 1p19q codeletion. Data about the type of IDH mutation should be collected in clinical practice and within interventional trials as this could be a critical variable for improved stratification and selection of patients.

Clinical and Molecular Features of Patients with Gliomas Harboring IDH1 Non-canonical Mutations: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Vincenzo Di Nunno;Enrico Franceschi;Lidia Gatto;Ilaria Maggio;Raffaele Lodi;
2022

Abstract

Introduction: The canonical isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 R132 mutation (IDH1 R132) is the most frequent mutation among IDH-mutated gliomas. Non-canonical IDH1 mutations or IDH2 mutations are unusual and their clinical and biological role is still unclear. Methods: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the clinical role of IDH non-canonical mutations. Results: Overall, we selected 13 of 3513 studies reporting data of 4007 patients with a diagnosis of grade 2 and grade 3 glioma including 3091 patients with a molecularly proven IDH1 or IDH2 mutation. Patients with non-canonical IDH1 mutations were younger and presented a higher DNA methylation level as compared to those with canonical IDH1 R132H alteration. The overall incidence of non-canonical IDH1 mutations was 7.9% (95% CI 5.4-10.7%) in patients with IDH-mutated gliomas. There was no statistical difference in terms of incidence between patients with grade 2 or grade 3 glioma. Patients with non-canonical IDH mutations had a lower rate of 1p19q codeletion (risk difference 31%, 95% CI 23-38%) and presented a significantly prolonged survival (pooled HR 0.47, 95% CI 0.28-0.81) as compared to those with IDH1 R132H mutation. Conclusion: Non-canonical IDH1 mutations occur in 7.9% of IDH-mutated gliomas and identify a specific subgroup of patients with an improved survival despite a lower rate of 1p19q codeletion. Data about the type of IDH mutation should be collected in clinical practice and within interventional trials as this could be a critical variable for improved stratification and selection of patients.
Vincenzo Di Nunno , Enrico Franceschi , Alicia Tosoni , Lidia Gatto , Ilaria Maggio , Raffaele Lodi , Daniele Angelini , Stefania Bartolini , Alba Ariela Brandes
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/864782
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