Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in advanced liver cirrhosis, a consequence of reduced kidney perfusion due to splanchnic arterial vasodilation and intrarenal vasoconstriction. It clinically manifests as hepatorenal syndrome type 1, type 2, or as acute tubular necrosis. Beyond hemodynamic factors, an additional mechanism may be hypothesized to explain the renal dysfunction during liver cirrhosis. Recent evidence suggest that such mechanisms may be closely related to obstructive jaundice. Methods: Given the not completely elucidated role of bile acids in kidney tissue damage, this study developed a rat model of AKI with liver cirrhosis induction by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) inhalation for 12 weeks. Histological analyses of renal and liver biopsies were performed at sacrifice. Organic anion tubular transporter distribution and apoptosis in kidney cells were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Circulating and urinary markers of inflammation and tubular injury were assayed in 21 treated rats over time (1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks of CCl4 administration) and 5 controls. Results: No renal histopathological alterations were found at sacrifice. Comparing treated rats with controls, organic anion transporters were differentially expressed and localized. High serum bile acid values were detected in cirrhotic animals, while caspase-3 staining was negative in both groups. Increased levels of serum inflammatory and urinary tubular injury biomarkers were observed during cirrhosis progression, with a peak after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment. Conclusions: These findings suggest possible adaptive tubular mechanisms for bile acid transporters in response to cirrhosis-induced AKI.

Adaptive Mechanisms of Renal Bile Acid Transporters in a Rat Model of Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Liver Cirrhosis

Donadei C.;Angeletti A.;Cappuccilli M.;Conte D.;Zappulo F.;Malvi D.;Aldini R.;Roda A.;La Manna G.
2022

Abstract

Background: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in advanced liver cirrhosis, a consequence of reduced kidney perfusion due to splanchnic arterial vasodilation and intrarenal vasoconstriction. It clinically manifests as hepatorenal syndrome type 1, type 2, or as acute tubular necrosis. Beyond hemodynamic factors, an additional mechanism may be hypothesized to explain the renal dysfunction during liver cirrhosis. Recent evidence suggest that such mechanisms may be closely related to obstructive jaundice. Methods: Given the not completely elucidated role of bile acids in kidney tissue damage, this study developed a rat model of AKI with liver cirrhosis induction by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) inhalation for 12 weeks. Histological analyses of renal and liver biopsies were performed at sacrifice. Organic anion tubular transporter distribution and apoptosis in kidney cells were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Circulating and urinary markers of inflammation and tubular injury were assayed in 21 treated rats over time (1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks of CCl4 administration) and 5 controls. Results: No renal histopathological alterations were found at sacrifice. Comparing treated rats with controls, organic anion transporters were differentially expressed and localized. High serum bile acid values were detected in cirrhotic animals, while caspase-3 staining was negative in both groups. Increased levels of serum inflammatory and urinary tubular injury biomarkers were observed during cirrhosis progression, with a peak after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment. Conclusions: These findings suggest possible adaptive tubular mechanisms for bile acid transporters in response to cirrhosis-induced AKI.
Donadei C.; Angeletti A.; Cappuccilli M.; Conti M.; Conte D.; Zappulo F.; De Giovanni A.; Malvi D.; Aldini R.; Roda A.; La Manna G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/849633
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