The presence of the lateral cervical nucleus (LCN) in different mammals, including humans, has been established in a number of anatomical research works. The LCN receives its afferent inputs from the spinocervical tract, and conveys this somatosensory information to the various brain areas, especially the thalamus. In the present study, the organization of the calf and pig LCN was examined through the use of thionine staining and immunohistochemical methods combined with morphometrical analyses. Specifically, the localization of calbindin-D28k (CB-D28k) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the LCN was investigated using the immunoperoxidase method. Calf and pig LCN appear as a clearly defined column of gray matter located in the three cranial segments of the cervical spinal cord. Thionine staining shows that polygonal neurons represent the main cell type in both species. The calf and pig LCN contained CB-D28k-immunoreactive (IR) neurons of varying sizes. Large neurons are probably involved in the generation of the cervicothalamic pathway. Small CB-D28k-IR neurons, on the other hand, could act as local interneurons. The immunoreactivity for nNOS was found to be mainly located in thin neuronal processes that could represent the terminal axonal portion of nNOS-IR found in laminae III e IV. This evidence suggests that nitric oxide (NO) could modulate the synaptic activity of the glutamatergic spinocervical tracts. These findings suggest that the LCN of Artiodactyls might play an important role in the transmission of somatosensory information from the spinal cord to the higher centers of the brain.

Anatomical organization of the lateral cervical nucleus in Artiodactyls

Grandis A.
Primo
;
Tagliavia C.;Salamanca G.;De Silva M.;Bombardi C.
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

The presence of the lateral cervical nucleus (LCN) in different mammals, including humans, has been established in a number of anatomical research works. The LCN receives its afferent inputs from the spinocervical tract, and conveys this somatosensory information to the various brain areas, especially the thalamus. In the present study, the organization of the calf and pig LCN was examined through the use of thionine staining and immunohistochemical methods combined with morphometrical analyses. Specifically, the localization of calbindin-D28k (CB-D28k) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the LCN was investigated using the immunoperoxidase method. Calf and pig LCN appear as a clearly defined column of gray matter located in the three cranial segments of the cervical spinal cord. Thionine staining shows that polygonal neurons represent the main cell type in both species. The calf and pig LCN contained CB-D28k-immunoreactive (IR) neurons of varying sizes. Large neurons are probably involved in the generation of the cervicothalamic pathway. Small CB-D28k-IR neurons, on the other hand, could act as local interneurons. The immunoreactivity for nNOS was found to be mainly located in thin neuronal processes that could represent the terminal axonal portion of nNOS-IR found in laminae III e IV. This evidence suggests that nitric oxide (NO) could modulate the synaptic activity of the glutamatergic spinocervical tracts. These findings suggest that the LCN of Artiodactyls might play an important role in the transmission of somatosensory information from the spinal cord to the higher centers of the brain.
Grandis A.; Gardini A.; Tagliavia C.; Salamanca G.; Graic J.-M.; De Silva M.; Bombardi C.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/846333
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