Down syndrome (DS), which is due to triplication of chromosome 21, is constantly associated with intellectual disability (ID). ID can be ascribed to both neurogenesis impairment and dendritic pathology. These defects are replicated in the Ts65Dn mouse, a widely used model of DS. While neurogenesis impairment in DS is a fetal event, dendritic pathology occurs after the first postnatal months. Neurogenesis alterations across the lifespan have been extensively studied in the Ts65Dn mouse. In contrast, there is scarce information regarding dendritic alterations at early life stages in this and other models, although there is evidence for dendritic alterations in adult mouse models. Thus, the goal of the current study was to establish whether dendritic alterations are already present in the neonatal period in Ts65Dn mice. In Golgi-stained brains we quantified the dendritic arbors of layer II/III pyramidal neurons in the frontal cortex of Ts65Dn mice aged 2 (P2) and 8 (P8) days and their euploid littermates. In P2 Ts65Dn mice we found a moderate hypotrophy of the apical and collateral dendrites but a patent hypotrophy of the basal dendrites. In P8 Ts65Dn mice the distalmost apical branches were missing or reduced in number but there were no alterations in the collateral and basal dendrites. No genotype effects were detected on either somatic or dendritic spine density. This study shows dendritic branching defects that mainly involve the basal domain in P2 Ts65Dn mice, and the apical but not the other domains in P8 Ts65Dn mice. This suggests that dendritic defects may be related to dendritic compartment and age. The lack of a severe dendritic pathology in Ts65Dn pups is reminiscent of the delayed appearance of patent dendritic alterations in newborns with DS. This similarly highlights the usefulness of the Ts65Dn model for the study of the mechanisms underlying dendritic alterations in DS and the design of possible therapeutic interventions.

Early appearance of dendritic alterations in neocortical pyramidal neurons of the Ts65Dn model of Down syndrome

Uguagliati, Beatrice;Stagni, Fiorenza;Emili, Marco;Giacomini, Andrea;Russo, Carla;Guidi, Sandra;Bartesaghi, Renata
2021

Abstract

Down syndrome (DS), which is due to triplication of chromosome 21, is constantly associated with intellectual disability (ID). ID can be ascribed to both neurogenesis impairment and dendritic pathology. These defects are replicated in the Ts65Dn mouse, a widely used model of DS. While neurogenesis impairment in DS is a fetal event, dendritic pathology occurs after the first postnatal months. Neurogenesis alterations across the lifespan have been extensively studied in the Ts65Dn mouse. In contrast, there is scarce information regarding dendritic alterations at early life stages in this and other models, although there is evidence for dendritic alterations in adult mouse models. Thus, the goal of the current study was to establish whether dendritic alterations are already present in the neonatal period in Ts65Dn mice. In Golgi-stained brains we quantified the dendritic arbors of layer II/III pyramidal neurons in the frontal cortex of Ts65Dn mice aged 2 (P2) and 8 (P8) days and their euploid littermates. In P2 Ts65Dn mice we found a moderate hypotrophy of the apical and collateral dendrites but a patent hypotrophy of the basal dendrites. In P8 Ts65Dn mice the distalmost apical branches were missing or reduced in number but there were no alterations in the collateral and basal dendrites. No genotype effects were detected on either somatic or dendritic spine density. This study shows dendritic branching defects that mainly involve the basal domain in P2 Ts65Dn mice, and the apical but not the other domains in P8 Ts65Dn mice. This suggests that dendritic defects may be related to dendritic compartment and age. The lack of a severe dendritic pathology in Ts65Dn pups is reminiscent of the delayed appearance of patent dendritic alterations in newborns with DS. This similarly highlights the usefulness of the Ts65Dn model for the study of the mechanisms underlying dendritic alterations in DS and the design of possible therapeutic interventions.
Uguagliati, Beatrice; Stagni, Fiorenza; Emili, Marco; Giacomini, Andrea; Russo, Carla; Guidi, Sandra; Bartesaghi, Renata
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/845299
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