Recent studies have worked towards addressing environmental issues such as global warming and greenhouse gas emissions due to the increasing awareness of the depletion of natural resources. The asphalt industry is seeking to implement measures to reduce its carbon footprint and to promote sustainable operations. The reuse of several wastes and by-products is an example of a more eco-friendly activity that fulfils the circular economy principle. Among all possible solutions, the road pavement sector encourages, on one hand, the use of recycled materials as a partial replacement of the virgin lithic skeleton; on the other hand, it promotes the use of recycled materials to substituting for a portion of the petroleum bituminous binder. This study aims to use Re-refined Engine Oil Bottoms (REOBs) as a main substitute and additives from various industrial by-products as a full replacement for virgin bitumen, producing high-performing alternative binders. The REOBs have been improved by utilizing additives in an attempt to improve their specific properties and thus to bridge the gap between REOBs and traditional bituminous binders. An even larger amount of virgin and non-renewable resources can be saved using these new potential alternative binders together with the RAP aggregates. Thus, the reduction in the use of virgin materials is applied at the binder and the asphalt mixture levels. Rheological, spectroscopic, thermogravimetric, and mechanical analysis were used to characterize the properties, composition, and characteristics of the REOBs, REOB-modified binders, and asphalt mixes. Thanks to the rheological investigations of possible alternative binders, 18 blends were selected, since they behaved like an SBS-modified bitumen, and then they were used for producing the corresponding asphalt mixtures. The preliminary mechanical analysis of the asphalt mixtures shows that six mixes have promising responses in terms of stiffness, tensile resistance, and water susceptibility. Nevertheless, the high variability of recycled materials and by-products has to be taken into consideration during the definition of alternative binders and recycled asphalt mixtures. In fact, this study highlights the crucial effects of the chemical composition of the constituents and their compatibility on the behaviour of the final product. This preliminary study represents a first attempt to define alternative binders, which can be used in combination with recycled aggregates for producing more sustainable road materials. However, further analysis is necessary in order to assess the durability and the ageing tendency of the materials.

Preliminary study on new alternative binders through Re-refined Engine Oil Bottoms (REOBs) and industrial by-product additives

Giulia Tarsi;Cesare Sangiorgi;
2021

Abstract

Recent studies have worked towards addressing environmental issues such as global warming and greenhouse gas emissions due to the increasing awareness of the depletion of natural resources. The asphalt industry is seeking to implement measures to reduce its carbon footprint and to promote sustainable operations. The reuse of several wastes and by-products is an example of a more eco-friendly activity that fulfils the circular economy principle. Among all possible solutions, the road pavement sector encourages, on one hand, the use of recycled materials as a partial replacement of the virgin lithic skeleton; on the other hand, it promotes the use of recycled materials to substituting for a portion of the petroleum bituminous binder. This study aims to use Re-refined Engine Oil Bottoms (REOBs) as a main substitute and additives from various industrial by-products as a full replacement for virgin bitumen, producing high-performing alternative binders. The REOBs have been improved by utilizing additives in an attempt to improve their specific properties and thus to bridge the gap between REOBs and traditional bituminous binders. An even larger amount of virgin and non-renewable resources can be saved using these new potential alternative binders together with the RAP aggregates. Thus, the reduction in the use of virgin materials is applied at the binder and the asphalt mixture levels. Rheological, spectroscopic, thermogravimetric, and mechanical analysis were used to characterize the properties, composition, and characteristics of the REOBs, REOB-modified binders, and asphalt mixes. Thanks to the rheological investigations of possible alternative binders, 18 blends were selected, since they behaved like an SBS-modified bitumen, and then they were used for producing the corresponding asphalt mixtures. The preliminary mechanical analysis of the asphalt mixtures shows that six mixes have promising responses in terms of stiffness, tensile resistance, and water susceptibility. Nevertheless, the high variability of recycled materials and by-products has to be taken into consideration during the definition of alternative binders and recycled asphalt mixtures. In fact, this study highlights the crucial effects of the chemical composition of the constituents and their compatibility on the behaviour of the final product. This preliminary study represents a first attempt to define alternative binders, which can be used in combination with recycled aggregates for producing more sustainable road materials. However, further analysis is necessary in order to assess the durability and the ageing tendency of the materials.
Michele Porto; Paolino Caputo; Valeria Loise; Abraham A. Abe; Giulia Tarsi; Cesare Sangiorgi; Francesco Gallo; Cesare Oliviero Rossi;
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/841395
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