Neurobehavioral research with non-human primates has shown that different attributes of motion stimuli, such as direction and speed can be stored in visual short-term memory (VSTM) with a high degree of accuracy. We examined VSTM for global motion with a memory masking paradigm to determine which stimulus attributes are important in the storage process. We presented in two visual quadrants global motion random dot kinematograms (RDKs), whereas in the two remaining visual quadrants we presented random-motion RDKs. This pattern of stimulation was displayed in two distinct temporal intervals, i.e., sample and test stimuli (duration: 200. ms), separated in time by a 3.2-s delay period. During the delay period a random- or directional-motion mask was presented briefly (200. ms) either at the beginning, in the middle or at the end of the delay period. The results showed that the mask mainly interferes with performance when displayed 200. ms after the offset of the sample and when it had a coherent direction rather than random directions. Moreover, the mask is significantly more effective when its direction and speed matched that of the remembered sample. These results support the notion that the memory representation of global motion is selective for direction and speed, being compromised by intervening directional stimuli presented immediately after the encoding phase. Moreover, this selectivity suggests that the same neural mechanisms involved in the processing of global motion may be recruited for its storage. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Pavan A., Langgartner D., Greenlee M.W. (2013). Visual short-term memory for global motion revealed by directional and speed-tuned masking. NEUROPSYCHOLOGIA, 51(5), 809-817 [10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.02.010].

Visual short-term memory for global motion revealed by directional and speed-tuned masking

Pavan A.;
2013

Abstract

Neurobehavioral research with non-human primates has shown that different attributes of motion stimuli, such as direction and speed can be stored in visual short-term memory (VSTM) with a high degree of accuracy. We examined VSTM for global motion with a memory masking paradigm to determine which stimulus attributes are important in the storage process. We presented in two visual quadrants global motion random dot kinematograms (RDKs), whereas in the two remaining visual quadrants we presented random-motion RDKs. This pattern of stimulation was displayed in two distinct temporal intervals, i.e., sample and test stimuli (duration: 200. ms), separated in time by a 3.2-s delay period. During the delay period a random- or directional-motion mask was presented briefly (200. ms) either at the beginning, in the middle or at the end of the delay period. The results showed that the mask mainly interferes with performance when displayed 200. ms after the offset of the sample and when it had a coherent direction rather than random directions. Moreover, the mask is significantly more effective when its direction and speed matched that of the remembered sample. These results support the notion that the memory representation of global motion is selective for direction and speed, being compromised by intervening directional stimuli presented immediately after the encoding phase. Moreover, this selectivity suggests that the same neural mechanisms involved in the processing of global motion may be recruited for its storage. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.
2013
Pavan A., Langgartner D., Greenlee M.W. (2013). Visual short-term memory for global motion revealed by directional and speed-tuned masking. NEUROPSYCHOLOGIA, 51(5), 809-817 [10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2013.02.010].
Pavan A.; Langgartner D.; Greenlee M.W.
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/836041
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 6
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 6
social impact