Transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) is a recent neuro-modulation technique whose effects at both behavioural and neural level are still debated. Here we employed the well-known phenomenon of motion after-effect (MAE) in order to investigate the effects of high-vs. low-frequency tRNS on motion adaptation and recovery. Participants were asked to estimate the MAE duration following prolonged adaptation (20 s) to a complex moving pattern, while being stimulated with either sham or tRNS across different blocks. Different groups were administered with either high-or low-frequency tRNS. Stimulation sites were either bilateral human MT complex (hMT +) or frontal areas. The results showed that, whereas no effects on MAE duration were induced by stimulating frontal areas, when applied to the bilateral hMT +, high-frequency tRNS caused a significant decrease in MAE duration whereas low-frequency tRNS caused a significant corresponding increase in MAE duration. These findings indicate that high-and low-frequency tRNS have opposed effects on the adaptation-dependent unbalance between neurons tuned to opposite motion directions, and thus on neuronal excitability.

Campana G., Camilleri R., Moret B., Ghin F., Pavan A. (2016). Opposite effects of high-and low-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation probed with visual motion adaptation. SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 6(1), 1-7 [10.1038/srep38919].

Opposite effects of high-and low-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation probed with visual motion adaptation

Pavan A.
2016

Abstract

Transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) is a recent neuro-modulation technique whose effects at both behavioural and neural level are still debated. Here we employed the well-known phenomenon of motion after-effect (MAE) in order to investigate the effects of high-vs. low-frequency tRNS on motion adaptation and recovery. Participants were asked to estimate the MAE duration following prolonged adaptation (20 s) to a complex moving pattern, while being stimulated with either sham or tRNS across different blocks. Different groups were administered with either high-or low-frequency tRNS. Stimulation sites were either bilateral human MT complex (hMT +) or frontal areas. The results showed that, whereas no effects on MAE duration were induced by stimulating frontal areas, when applied to the bilateral hMT +, high-frequency tRNS caused a significant decrease in MAE duration whereas low-frequency tRNS caused a significant corresponding increase in MAE duration. These findings indicate that high-and low-frequency tRNS have opposed effects on the adaptation-dependent unbalance between neurons tuned to opposite motion directions, and thus on neuronal excitability.
2016
Campana G., Camilleri R., Moret B., Ghin F., Pavan A. (2016). Opposite effects of high-and low-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation probed with visual motion adaptation. SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 6(1), 1-7 [10.1038/srep38919].
Campana G.; Camilleri R.; Moret B.; Ghin F.; Pavan A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/835972
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