Microcurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation (MENS) is believed to alter blood flow, increasing cutaneous blood perfusion, with vasodilation and hyperemia. According to these physiological mechanisms, we investigated the short-term effects of MENS on constant-load exercise and the subsequent recovery process. Ten healthy subjects performed, on separate days, constant-load cycling, which was preceded and followed by active or inactive stimulation to the right quadricep. Blood lactate, pulmonary oxygen, and muscle deoxyhemoglobin on-transition kinetics were recorded. Hemodynamic parameters, heart rate variability, and baroreflex sensitivity were collected and used as a tool to investigate the recovery process. Microcurrent stimulation caused a faster deoxyhemoglobin (4.43 ± 0.5 vs. 5.80 ± 0.5 s) and a slower VO2 (25.19 ± 2.1 vs. 21.94 ± 1.3 s) on-kinetics during cycling, with higher lactate levels immediately after treatments executed before exercise (1.55 ± 0.1 vs. 1.40 ± 0.1 mmol/L) and after exercise (2.15 ± 0.1 vs. 1.79 ± 0.1 mmol/L). In conclusion, MENS applied before exercise produced an increase in oxygen extraction at muscle microvasculature. In contrast, MENS applied after exercise improved recovery, with the sympathovagal balance shifted toward a state of parasympathetic predominance. MENS also caused higher lactate values, which may be due to the magnitude of the muscular stress by both manual treatment and electrical stimulation than control condition in which the muscle received only a manual treatment.

Effects of acute microcurrent electrical stimulation on muscle function and subsequent recovery strategy

Piras A.
Primo
;
Campa F.
Penultimo
;
Raffi M.
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Microcurrent electrical neuromuscular stimulation (MENS) is believed to alter blood flow, increasing cutaneous blood perfusion, with vasodilation and hyperemia. According to these physiological mechanisms, we investigated the short-term effects of MENS on constant-load exercise and the subsequent recovery process. Ten healthy subjects performed, on separate days, constant-load cycling, which was preceded and followed by active or inactive stimulation to the right quadricep. Blood lactate, pulmonary oxygen, and muscle deoxyhemoglobin on-transition kinetics were recorded. Hemodynamic parameters, heart rate variability, and baroreflex sensitivity were collected and used as a tool to investigate the recovery process. Microcurrent stimulation caused a faster deoxyhemoglobin (4.43 ± 0.5 vs. 5.80 ± 0.5 s) and a slower VO2 (25.19 ± 2.1 vs. 21.94 ± 1.3 s) on-kinetics during cycling, with higher lactate levels immediately after treatments executed before exercise (1.55 ± 0.1 vs. 1.40 ± 0.1 mmol/L) and after exercise (2.15 ± 0.1 vs. 1.79 ± 0.1 mmol/L). In conclusion, MENS applied before exercise produced an increase in oxygen extraction at muscle microvasculature. In contrast, MENS applied after exercise improved recovery, with the sympathovagal balance shifted toward a state of parasympathetic predominance. MENS also caused higher lactate values, which may be due to the magnitude of the muscular stress by both manual treatment and electrical stimulation than control condition in which the muscle received only a manual treatment.
2021
Piras A.; Zini L.; Trofe A.; Campa F.; Raffi M.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/832915
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