In the past few years, nanoparticle production by a size-controlled or shaped-controlled procedure has become a new and interesting research focus. Silver nanoparticle, (AgNPs) materials have a wide range of applications: can be used as antistatic materials, cryogenic superconducting materials [1], biosensor materials [2], catalysis [3], antibacterial materials [4], etc. With regard to the latter application, because of their effective antimicrobial properties and low toxicity toward mammalian cells, AgNPs have become one of the most commonly used nanomaterials in consumer products and in membrane-based water filtration systems [5]. The toxicity of AgNPs to bacteria is greatly influenced by AgNPs particle size and shape [6]. Generally, the shape, size and size distribution of silver particles can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions such as reducing agent, stabilizer and so on [7] or employing different synthetic methods. During the last few years, many methods have been employed to prepare silver nanoparticles [8]. Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) seem well positioned to address the challenge of preparing stable, active silver nanoparticles, due to their high chemical and thermal stability, negligible vapor pressure, recyclability, high conductivity and wide electrochemical window [9]. Moreover, low interfacial tensions result in high nucleation rates, allowing formation of very small particles because Ostwald ripening occurs only weakly. Further, the chemical and physical interaction between the ionic liquid and the metal plays a decisive role in controlling the size and structure of the nanoparticles [10]. In this work, the functionalized RTIL, 1-(2-aminoethyl)-3-methylimidazolium salts [IL-NH2]X (X = BF4, NO3) [11], were employed in the reduction of aqueous AgNO3 with NaBH4 in different IL:Ag molar ratio. The resulting, stabilized silver nanoparticles retained long-term stability without special protection and were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), UV-vis spectroscopy and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The role played by the IL’s counter ion as well as the IL:Ag molar ratio, in the AgNPs morphology, size and size distribution is presented and discussed. References [1] S. Hirano, Y. Wakasa, A. Saka, S. Yoshizawa, Y. Oya-Seimiya, Y. Hishinuma, A. Nishimura, A. Matsumoto, H. Kumakura, Physica C 392 458 (2003). [2] X.L. Ren, F.Q. Tang, Acta Chim. Sinica 60 393 (2002). [3] H.J. Zhai, D.W. Sun, H.S. Wang, J. Nanosci. Nanotechnol. 6 1968 (2006). [4] H.Q. Jiang, S. Manolache, A.C.L. Wong, F.S. Denes, J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 93 1411 (2004). [5] J.R. Morones, J.L. Elechiguerra, A. Camacho, K. Holt, J.B., Kouri, J.T. Ramirez, M.J. Yacaman, Nanotechnology 16 2346 (2005). [6] S. Pal, Y.K., Tak, J.M., Song, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 73, 1712. (2007). [7] B.L. He, J.J. Tan, Y.L. Kong, H.F. Liu, J. Mol. Catal. A: Chem. 221 121 (2004). [8] H.S. Wang, X.L. Qiao, J.G. Chen, S.Y. Ding, Colloids Surf. A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 256 111 (2005). [9] H. Li, R. Liu, R. X. Zhao, Y. F. Zheng, W. X. Chen and Z. D. Xu, Cryst. Growth Des. 6 2795 (2006). [10] M. Antonietti, D.B. Kuang, B. Smarsly and Y. Zhou, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 43 4988 (2004). [11] L. Busetto, M.C. Cassani, C. Femoni, A. Macchioni, R. Mazzoni, D. Zuccaccia, J. Organomet. Chem. 693, 2579 (2008).

Synthesis of silver nanoparticles stabilized by amine-terminated ionic liquids

BALLARIN, BARBARA;BENELLI, TIZIANA;BOANINI, ELISA;BUSETTO, LUIGI;CASSANI, MARIA CRISTINA
2009

Abstract

In the past few years, nanoparticle production by a size-controlled or shaped-controlled procedure has become a new and interesting research focus. Silver nanoparticle, (AgNPs) materials have a wide range of applications: can be used as antistatic materials, cryogenic superconducting materials [1], biosensor materials [2], catalysis [3], antibacterial materials [4], etc. With regard to the latter application, because of their effective antimicrobial properties and low toxicity toward mammalian cells, AgNPs have become one of the most commonly used nanomaterials in consumer products and in membrane-based water filtration systems [5]. The toxicity of AgNPs to bacteria is greatly influenced by AgNPs particle size and shape [6]. Generally, the shape, size and size distribution of silver particles can be controlled by adjusting the reaction conditions such as reducing agent, stabilizer and so on [7] or employing different synthetic methods. During the last few years, many methods have been employed to prepare silver nanoparticles [8]. Room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) seem well positioned to address the challenge of preparing stable, active silver nanoparticles, due to their high chemical and thermal stability, negligible vapor pressure, recyclability, high conductivity and wide electrochemical window [9]. Moreover, low interfacial tensions result in high nucleation rates, allowing formation of very small particles because Ostwald ripening occurs only weakly. Further, the chemical and physical interaction between the ionic liquid and the metal plays a decisive role in controlling the size and structure of the nanoparticles [10]. In this work, the functionalized RTIL, 1-(2-aminoethyl)-3-methylimidazolium salts [IL-NH2]X (X = BF4, NO3) [11], were employed in the reduction of aqueous AgNO3 with NaBH4 in different IL:Ag molar ratio. The resulting, stabilized silver nanoparticles retained long-term stability without special protection and were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), UV-vis spectroscopy and Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA). The role played by the IL’s counter ion as well as the IL:Ag molar ratio, in the AgNPs morphology, size and size distribution is presented and discussed. References [1] S. Hirano, Y. Wakasa, A. Saka, S. Yoshizawa, Y. Oya-Seimiya, Y. Hishinuma, A. Nishimura, A. Matsumoto, H. Kumakura, Physica C 392 458 (2003). [2] X.L. Ren, F.Q. Tang, Acta Chim. Sinica 60 393 (2002). [3] H.J. Zhai, D.W. Sun, H.S. Wang, J. Nanosci. Nanotechnol. 6 1968 (2006). [4] H.Q. Jiang, S. Manolache, A.C.L. Wong, F.S. Denes, J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 93 1411 (2004). [5] J.R. Morones, J.L. Elechiguerra, A. Camacho, K. Holt, J.B., Kouri, J.T. Ramirez, M.J. Yacaman, Nanotechnology 16 2346 (2005). [6] S. Pal, Y.K., Tak, J.M., Song, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 73, 1712. (2007). [7] B.L. He, J.J. Tan, Y.L. Kong, H.F. Liu, J. Mol. Catal. A: Chem. 221 121 (2004). [8] H.S. Wang, X.L. Qiao, J.G. Chen, S.Y. Ding, Colloids Surf. A: Physicochem. Eng. Aspects 256 111 (2005). [9] H. Li, R. Liu, R. X. Zhao, Y. F. Zheng, W. X. Chen and Z. D. Xu, Cryst. Growth Des. 6 2795 (2006). [10] M. Antonietti, D.B. Kuang, B. Smarsly and Y. Zhou, Angew. Chem., Int. Ed. 43 4988 (2004). [11] L. Busetto, M.C. Cassani, C. Femoni, A. Macchioni, R. Mazzoni, D. Zuccaccia, J. Organomet. Chem. 693, 2579 (2008).
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B. Ballarin; T. Benelli; E. Boanini; L. Busetto; M. C. Cassani
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/83290
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