Aims: The link between spectral diversity and in-­situ plant biodiversity is one prom- ising approach to using remote sensing for biodiversity assessment. Nevertheless, there is little evidence as to whether this link is maintained at fine scales, as well as to how it is influenced by vegetation's vertical complexity. Here we test, at the com- munity level in grasslands, the link between diversity of the spectral signal (SDiv) and taxonomic diversity (TDiv), and the influence of vertical complexity. Methods: We used 196 1.5 m × 1.5 m experimental communities with different biodiversity levels. To measure vertical complexity, we quantified height diversity (HDiv) of the most abundant species in the community. TDiv was calculated using the Shannon index based on species cover. Canopy spectral information was gathered using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) mounted with a multi-­spectral sensor provid- ing spectral information via six 10-­nm bands covering the visible and near-­infrared region at a spatial resolution of 3 cm. We measured SDiv in a core area of 1 m ×1 m within the communities as mean Euclidean distance of all pixels in a feature space spanned between the two first components of a PCA calculated for the complete raster stack. We modelled SDiv through mixed-­effect linear models, using TDiv, HDiv, and their interaction as fixed-­effect predictors. Results: Contrary to our expectations, TDiv was negatively linked to SDiv. The diversity in plant height was positively related to SDiv. More importantly, diversity in plant height and TDiv had a significant negative interaction, meaning the more complex the vegeta- tion was in terms of height, the more the SDiv –­ TDiv relationship became negative. Conclusions: Our results suggest that in order to exploit the SDiv–­ TDiv link for moni- toring purposes, it needs to be contextualized. Moreover, the results highlight that communities’ functional characteristics (i.e. plant height) mediate such a link, calling for new insights into the relation between SDiv and functional diversity.

Conti, L., Malavasi, M., Galland, T., Komárek, J., Lagner, O., Carmona, C.P., et al. (2021). The relationship between species and spectral diversity in grassland communities is mediated by their vertical complexity. APPLIED VEGETATION SCIENCE, 24(3), 1-8 [10.1111/avsc.12600].

The relationship between species and spectral diversity in grassland communities is mediated by their vertical complexity

Conti, Luisa;Rocchini, Duccio;
2021

Abstract

Aims: The link between spectral diversity and in-­situ plant biodiversity is one prom- ising approach to using remote sensing for biodiversity assessment. Nevertheless, there is little evidence as to whether this link is maintained at fine scales, as well as to how it is influenced by vegetation's vertical complexity. Here we test, at the com- munity level in grasslands, the link between diversity of the spectral signal (SDiv) and taxonomic diversity (TDiv), and the influence of vertical complexity. Methods: We used 196 1.5 m × 1.5 m experimental communities with different biodiversity levels. To measure vertical complexity, we quantified height diversity (HDiv) of the most abundant species in the community. TDiv was calculated using the Shannon index based on species cover. Canopy spectral information was gathered using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) mounted with a multi-­spectral sensor provid- ing spectral information via six 10-­nm bands covering the visible and near-­infrared region at a spatial resolution of 3 cm. We measured SDiv in a core area of 1 m ×1 m within the communities as mean Euclidean distance of all pixels in a feature space spanned between the two first components of a PCA calculated for the complete raster stack. We modelled SDiv through mixed-­effect linear models, using TDiv, HDiv, and their interaction as fixed-­effect predictors. Results: Contrary to our expectations, TDiv was negatively linked to SDiv. The diversity in plant height was positively related to SDiv. More importantly, diversity in plant height and TDiv had a significant negative interaction, meaning the more complex the vegeta- tion was in terms of height, the more the SDiv –­ TDiv relationship became negative. Conclusions: Our results suggest that in order to exploit the SDiv–­ TDiv link for moni- toring purposes, it needs to be contextualized. Moreover, the results highlight that communities’ functional characteristics (i.e. plant height) mediate such a link, calling for new insights into the relation between SDiv and functional diversity.
2021
Conti, L., Malavasi, M., Galland, T., Komárek, J., Lagner, O., Carmona, C.P., et al. (2021). The relationship between species and spectral diversity in grassland communities is mediated by their vertical complexity. APPLIED VEGETATION SCIENCE, 24(3), 1-8 [10.1111/avsc.12600].
Conti, Luisa; Malavasi, Marco; Galland, Thomas; Komárek, Jan; Lagner, Ondřej; Carmona, Carlos P.; Bello, Francesco; Rocchini, Duccio; Šímová, Petra...espandi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/829957
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