Cyanobacteria are oxygenic phototrophs that have an essential role in soil N2 fixation, fertility, and water retention. Cyanobacteria are also natural sources of bioactive metabolites beneficial to improve plant vigor and potentially active against fungal plant pathogens. Therefore, we studied the antifungal activity of water extract (WE) and phycobiliproteins (PBPs) from Anabaena minutissima strain BEA 0300B against the fungal plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea on tomato fruits and in vitro. The water extract and PBPs were characterized by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies. Both water extract (5 mg/mL) and PBPs (ranged from 0.3 to 4.8 mg/mL) reduced disease incidence and disease severity on tomato fruits and mycelium growth and colony forming units in vitro. For mycelium growth, a linear PBP dose-response was found. Tomato fruits were also characterized by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies in order to evaluate structural modifications induced by pathogen and PBP treatment. PBPs preserved cutin and pectin structures by pathogen challenge. In conclusion, A. minutissima can be considered a potential tool for future large-scale experiments for plant disease control.

Assessing the potential of the terrestrial cyanobacterium Anabaena minutissima for controlling Botrytis cinerea on tomato fruits

Righini H.
Primo
;
Francioso O.
Secondo
;
Di Foggia M.;Roberti R.
Ultimo
2021

Abstract

Cyanobacteria are oxygenic phototrophs that have an essential role in soil N2 fixation, fertility, and water retention. Cyanobacteria are also natural sources of bioactive metabolites beneficial to improve plant vigor and potentially active against fungal plant pathogens. Therefore, we studied the antifungal activity of water extract (WE) and phycobiliproteins (PBPs) from Anabaena minutissima strain BEA 0300B against the fungal plant pathogen Botrytis cinerea on tomato fruits and in vitro. The water extract and PBPs were characterized by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies. Both water extract (5 mg/mL) and PBPs (ranged from 0.3 to 4.8 mg/mL) reduced disease incidence and disease severity on tomato fruits and mycelium growth and colony forming units in vitro. For mycelium growth, a linear PBP dose-response was found. Tomato fruits were also characterized by FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies in order to evaluate structural modifications induced by pathogen and PBP treatment. PBPs preserved cutin and pectin structures by pathogen challenge. In conclusion, A. minutissima can be considered a potential tool for future large-scale experiments for plant disease control.
Righini H.; Francioso O.; Di Foggia M.; Quintana A.M.; Roberti R.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/829859
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