Introduction: The metabolic syndrome is frequently associated with liver disease; the presence of obesity and diabetes boost progression to liver cirrhosis. These conditions make lifestyle changes aiming weight loss, crucial for prevention and treatment. The Mediterranean Diet (MD) has proved to be the most useful tool for losing and maintaining weight, protecting from cardiovascular mortality. Aim: To evaluate calorie intake (CI) and adherence to MD in patients affected by liver disease, cared for in the setting of a Metabolic Unit, in relation to BMI and basal metabolic rate (BMR). Materials and Methods: We studied all patients referred to the Unit from October 2019 to March 2020 (n=60), 24% had a viral etiology, 74% dismetabolic and 2% other etiologies. For the stage of disease, 50.7% had hepatitis, 34% had a diagnosis of cirrhosis and 15.3% were transplanted. CI was determined by means of an in-house developed questionnaire ("QuantoMangioVeramente"-QMV), measuring the CI on the basis of 20 items; the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) was used for evaluating adherence to MD; BMR and body composition were assessed by bioimpedance analysis. Results: Males (66%), mean age 61.5 years (±8.9), 71% had diabetes, weight 84.6 kg (±18.5), BMI 30.9 kg/m2(±5.7), lean mass 58.2 kg (±10), total body water 48.7% (±5.4), fat mass 31.1% (±8.5), BMR 1607Kcal (±251), CI from QMV 1808Kcal (±589), 1331Kcal (±438) in females vs. 2020Kcal (±523) in males (p<0.0001). Adherence to MD was medium-low in 47% of the population (51% of males vs. 37.5% of females, p<0.001). Adherence was inversely correlated to the daily CI (p<0.0001). BMI was similar between sexes, whereas the fat mass was higher in females (p<0.0001). Conclusions: Given the low adherence to MD, it is essential to invest resources on nutritional counseling, to improve eating habits of patients with liver disease and eliminate a behavioral risk factor for disease progression.

Eating habits in patients affected by metabolic syndrome and liver disease (hepatitis, cirrhosis and liver transplant)

Brodosi L
Primo
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Mita D
Secondo
Data Curation
;
Simonetti G
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Marchesini G
Penultimo
Writing – Review & Editing
;
Pironi L.
Ultimo
Supervision
2021

Abstract

Introduction: The metabolic syndrome is frequently associated with liver disease; the presence of obesity and diabetes boost progression to liver cirrhosis. These conditions make lifestyle changes aiming weight loss, crucial for prevention and treatment. The Mediterranean Diet (MD) has proved to be the most useful tool for losing and maintaining weight, protecting from cardiovascular mortality. Aim: To evaluate calorie intake (CI) and adherence to MD in patients affected by liver disease, cared for in the setting of a Metabolic Unit, in relation to BMI and basal metabolic rate (BMR). Materials and Methods: We studied all patients referred to the Unit from October 2019 to March 2020 (n=60), 24% had a viral etiology, 74% dismetabolic and 2% other etiologies. For the stage of disease, 50.7% had hepatitis, 34% had a diagnosis of cirrhosis and 15.3% were transplanted. CI was determined by means of an in-house developed questionnaire ("QuantoMangioVeramente"-QMV), measuring the CI on the basis of 20 items; the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) was used for evaluating adherence to MD; BMR and body composition were assessed by bioimpedance analysis. Results: Males (66%), mean age 61.5 years (±8.9), 71% had diabetes, weight 84.6 kg (±18.5), BMI 30.9 kg/m2(±5.7), lean mass 58.2 kg (±10), total body water 48.7% (±5.4), fat mass 31.1% (±8.5), BMR 1607Kcal (±251), CI from QMV 1808Kcal (±589), 1331Kcal (±438) in females vs. 2020Kcal (±523) in males (p<0.0001). Adherence to MD was medium-low in 47% of the population (51% of males vs. 37.5% of females, p<0.001). Adherence was inversely correlated to the daily CI (p<0.0001). BMI was similar between sexes, whereas the fat mass was higher in females (p<0.0001). Conclusions: Given the low adherence to MD, it is essential to invest resources on nutritional counseling, to improve eating habits of patients with liver disease and eliminate a behavioral risk factor for disease progression.
Digestive and Liver Disease
S23
S23
Brodosi L, Mita D, Simonetti G, Vitale G, Gentile A, Genovese M, Marchesini G, Morelli MC, Pironi L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/829762
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