Climate is regulated by the carbonate–silicate cycle in which slab outgassing of C into deep fluids and volcanic degassing of CO2 into the atmosphere are an important part. However, the mechanisms of C mobility in subduction zones remain largely unresolved. Previous research has focused mainly on investigating the upward transfer of slab-derived carbonic fluids for the forearc mantle metasomatism and partial melting. Furthermore, percolation of CO2-bearing fluids parallel to the downgoing plates can potentially drive carbonation of subducted rocks, which influences the global estimates of C fluxes at convergent margins. Nevertheless, the geological conditions and processes leading to the carbonation of subduction-zone lithologies by fluid–rock interactions are still poorly understood. Here, we present new field, petrological, and isotopic results of carbonated serpentinites—high-pressure (HP) ophidolomites and low-pressure (LP) ophimagnesites and listvenites—from the Chinese southwestern Tianshan HP–UHP metamorphic belt. These rocks recorded the carbonation of subduction-zone serpentinites at HP and LP conditions during exhumation, reflecting the multistage transfer and infiltration of carbonic fluids along the plate boundary. The HP ophidolomites are characterized by the growth of carbonates (dolomite, aragonite, and Mg- calcite) at the expense of silicates in the host serpentinites. Integrated Sr–C–O isotopic data and thermodynamic modelling suggest that carbonic fluids (containing a CO2,aq concentration of up to 1.9 molal) emanating from carbonate-bearing meta- mafic rocks (e.g., eclogites) likely contributed to HP carbonation of serpentinites at about 15–25 kbar and 550–600 C. The close contact of ophidolomites and carbonated metasedimentary rocks in the field as well as their similarities in Sr isotope compositions suggests that the latter could also have acted as the possible C source. Alternatively, both lithologies may have formed by coupled HP carbonation along the lithological interface between serpentinites and metasedimentary rocks. Subsequent fluid–rock interactions at relatively shallow crustal levels resulted in a second stage of serpentinite carbonation to form LP ophimagnesites and listvenites, during which the metasomatic CO2-bearing fluids may have originated from metasedimentary rocks. The multistage CO2 sequestration in subduction-zone serpentinites implies that hydrated ultramafic rocks in sub- ducted slabs are highly effective reactants to capture and store slab-released C over a wide range of P–T conditions, with the potential to substantially control the C distribution between shallow and deep reservoirs and thus modulate C fluxes in sub- duction zones.

Peng W., Z.L. (2020). Multistage CO2 sequestration in the subduction zone: Insights from exhumed carbonated serpentinites, SW Tianshan UHP belt, China. GEOCHIMICA ET COSMOCHIMICA ACTA, 270, 218-243 [10.1016/j.gca.2019.11.025].

Multistage CO2 sequestration in the subduction zone: Insights from exhumed carbonated serpentinites, SW Tianshan UHP belt, China

Vitale Brovarone A.;
2020

Abstract

Climate is regulated by the carbonate–silicate cycle in which slab outgassing of C into deep fluids and volcanic degassing of CO2 into the atmosphere are an important part. However, the mechanisms of C mobility in subduction zones remain largely unresolved. Previous research has focused mainly on investigating the upward transfer of slab-derived carbonic fluids for the forearc mantle metasomatism and partial melting. Furthermore, percolation of CO2-bearing fluids parallel to the downgoing plates can potentially drive carbonation of subducted rocks, which influences the global estimates of C fluxes at convergent margins. Nevertheless, the geological conditions and processes leading to the carbonation of subduction-zone lithologies by fluid–rock interactions are still poorly understood. Here, we present new field, petrological, and isotopic results of carbonated serpentinites—high-pressure (HP) ophidolomites and low-pressure (LP) ophimagnesites and listvenites—from the Chinese southwestern Tianshan HP–UHP metamorphic belt. These rocks recorded the carbonation of subduction-zone serpentinites at HP and LP conditions during exhumation, reflecting the multistage transfer and infiltration of carbonic fluids along the plate boundary. The HP ophidolomites are characterized by the growth of carbonates (dolomite, aragonite, and Mg- calcite) at the expense of silicates in the host serpentinites. Integrated Sr–C–O isotopic data and thermodynamic modelling suggest that carbonic fluids (containing a CO2,aq concentration of up to 1.9 molal) emanating from carbonate-bearing meta- mafic rocks (e.g., eclogites) likely contributed to HP carbonation of serpentinites at about 15–25 kbar and 550–600 C. The close contact of ophidolomites and carbonated metasedimentary rocks in the field as well as their similarities in Sr isotope compositions suggests that the latter could also have acted as the possible C source. Alternatively, both lithologies may have formed by coupled HP carbonation along the lithological interface between serpentinites and metasedimentary rocks. Subsequent fluid–rock interactions at relatively shallow crustal levels resulted in a second stage of serpentinite carbonation to form LP ophimagnesites and listvenites, during which the metasomatic CO2-bearing fluids may have originated from metasedimentary rocks. The multistage CO2 sequestration in subduction-zone serpentinites implies that hydrated ultramafic rocks in sub- ducted slabs are highly effective reactants to capture and store slab-released C over a wide range of P–T conditions, with the potential to substantially control the C distribution between shallow and deep reservoirs and thus modulate C fluxes in sub- duction zones.
2020
Peng W., Z.L. (2020). Multistage CO2 sequestration in the subduction zone: Insights from exhumed carbonated serpentinites, SW Tianshan UHP belt, China. GEOCHIMICA ET COSMOCHIMICA ACTA, 270, 218-243 [10.1016/j.gca.2019.11.025].
Peng W., Zhang L., Menzel M.D., Vitale Brovarone A., Tumiati S., Shen T., Hu H.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/827258
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