What shape does Salafism take in Tunisia after the ban of the Salafi-Jihadi group Ansar al-Shari‘a and the wave of securitization carried out by national authorities? This article argues that a constraining legal context put Salafism’s doctrinal rigidity in tension with its survival and ultimately prompted a residual current of Salafi actors to accommodate their stance toward Malikism, the prevalent school (madhhab) in the country. This adaptation is at odds with contemporary Salafism, which traditionally dismisses all four law schools (lā madhabiyya), rejects their blind imitation (taqlῑd), and claims the superiority of the Qur’an, hadith, and consensus of the salaf (pious predecessors) over jurisprudence ( fiqh). To account for this puzzle, this article scrutinizes the historical development of Salafism and the evolution of its stance toward Malikism across three generational waves. It notably shows how religious securitization associated with the promotion of a “moderate” Islam pushed Salafi actors to redefine their ideology to preserve their preaching and teaching activities. We call Salafi-Malikism the outcome of this adaptive strategy. Drawing on the Tunisian case, we argue that, despite its purist claims, Salafism is not an immutable religious current, but can take different trajectories to survive in constraining environments.

Fabio Merone, Théo Blanc, Ester Sigillò (2021). The Evolution of Tunisian Salafism after the Revolution: From La Maddhabiyya to Salafi-Malikism. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST STUDIES, 53(3), 455-470 [10.1017/S0020743821000143].

The Evolution of Tunisian Salafism after the Revolution: From La Maddhabiyya to Salafi-Malikism

Ester Sigillò
2021

Abstract

What shape does Salafism take in Tunisia after the ban of the Salafi-Jihadi group Ansar al-Shari‘a and the wave of securitization carried out by national authorities? This article argues that a constraining legal context put Salafism’s doctrinal rigidity in tension with its survival and ultimately prompted a residual current of Salafi actors to accommodate their stance toward Malikism, the prevalent school (madhhab) in the country. This adaptation is at odds with contemporary Salafism, which traditionally dismisses all four law schools (lā madhabiyya), rejects their blind imitation (taqlῑd), and claims the superiority of the Qur’an, hadith, and consensus of the salaf (pious predecessors) over jurisprudence ( fiqh). To account for this puzzle, this article scrutinizes the historical development of Salafism and the evolution of its stance toward Malikism across three generational waves. It notably shows how religious securitization associated with the promotion of a “moderate” Islam pushed Salafi actors to redefine their ideology to preserve their preaching and teaching activities. We call Salafi-Malikism the outcome of this adaptive strategy. Drawing on the Tunisian case, we argue that, despite its purist claims, Salafism is not an immutable religious current, but can take different trajectories to survive in constraining environments.
2021
Fabio Merone, Théo Blanc, Ester Sigillò (2021). The Evolution of Tunisian Salafism after the Revolution: From La Maddhabiyya to Salafi-Malikism. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MIDDLE EAST STUDIES, 53(3), 455-470 [10.1017/S0020743821000143].
Fabio Merone; Théo Blanc; Ester Sigillò;
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/821835
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