The Canary Islands are still largely dependent on expensive imported fossil fuels, are stressed by the increasing touristic impact and are extremely vulnerable to climate change due to water scarcity. Water desalinisation is an energy-demanding process and is essential to the sustainable development of these islands. The aim of this study is to explore the potential advantages of a hybrid installation, exploiting two different renewable energy sources, specifically waves and solar, to supply a large desalination plant in Tenerife. The paper ultimately provides a generally applicable procedure for the design of hybrid installations, including three steps: the assessment of available renewable energy sources, the optimal combination of these sources and finally the economic assessment. The wave and solar resources are assessed first, then the hybrid installation is conceptually designed, proposing a criterion for the optimal mixing of the renewable energy sources that can be applied to other resources and other sites. The basic idea is to maximise the exploitation of the renewable power, minimizing the need of the fossil-based back-up system. The costs of the hybrid installation are finally assessed considering the sensitivity to government incentives, showing that the project parity point is reached within the lifetime of typical desalination plants (i.e. 40 years) and can be significantly more attractive in case of Feed-In-Tariffs available in other European countries.

Towards green transition of touristic islands through hybrid renewable energy systems. A case study in Tenerife, Canary Islands

Dallavalle E.;Cipolletta M.;Casson Moreno V.;Cozzani V.;Zanuttigh B.
2021

Abstract

The Canary Islands are still largely dependent on expensive imported fossil fuels, are stressed by the increasing touristic impact and are extremely vulnerable to climate change due to water scarcity. Water desalinisation is an energy-demanding process and is essential to the sustainable development of these islands. The aim of this study is to explore the potential advantages of a hybrid installation, exploiting two different renewable energy sources, specifically waves and solar, to supply a large desalination plant in Tenerife. The paper ultimately provides a generally applicable procedure for the design of hybrid installations, including three steps: the assessment of available renewable energy sources, the optimal combination of these sources and finally the economic assessment. The wave and solar resources are assessed first, then the hybrid installation is conceptually designed, proposing a criterion for the optimal mixing of the renewable energy sources that can be applied to other resources and other sites. The basic idea is to maximise the exploitation of the renewable power, minimizing the need of the fossil-based back-up system. The costs of the hybrid installation are finally assessed considering the sensitivity to government incentives, showing that the project parity point is reached within the lifetime of typical desalination plants (i.e. 40 years) and can be significantly more attractive in case of Feed-In-Tariffs available in other European countries.
Dallavalle E.; Cipolletta M.; Casson Moreno V.; Cozzani V.; Zanuttigh B.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/820438
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