Genodermatosis such as hair disorders mostly follow a monogenic mode of inheritance. Congenital hypotrichosis (HY) belong to this group of disorders and is characterized by abnormally reduced hair since birth. The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinical phenotype of a breed-specific non-syndromic form of HY in Belted Galloway cattle and to identify the causative genetic variant for this recessive disorder. An affected calf born in Switzerland presented with multiple small to large areas of alopecia on the limbs and on the dorsal part of the head, neck, and back. A genome-wide association study using Swiss and US Belted Galloway cattle encompassing 12 cases and 61 controls revealed an association signal on chromosome 29. Homozygosity mapping in a subset of cases refined the HY locus to a 1.5 Mb critical interval and subsequent Sanger sequencing of protein-coding exons of positional candidate genes revealed a stop gain variant in the HEPHL1 gene that encodes a multi-copper ferroxidase protein so-called hephaestin like 1 (c.1684A>T; p.Lys562*). A perfect concordance between the homozygous presence of this most likely pathogenic loss-of-function variant and the HY phenotype was found. Genotyping of more than 700 purebred Swiss and US Belted Galloway cattle showed the global spread of the mutation. This study provides a molecular test that will permit the avoidance of risk matings by systematic genotyping of relevant breeding animals. This rare recessive HEPHL1-related form of hypotrichosis provides a novel large animal model for similar human conditions. The results have been incorporated in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) database (OMIA 002230-9913).

A Nonsense Variant in Hephaestin Like 1 (HEPHL1) Is Responsible for Congenital Hypotrichosis in Belted Galloway Cattle

Jacinto, Joana G. P.;
2021

Abstract

Genodermatosis such as hair disorders mostly follow a monogenic mode of inheritance. Congenital hypotrichosis (HY) belong to this group of disorders and is characterized by abnormally reduced hair since birth. The purpose of this study was to characterize the clinical phenotype of a breed-specific non-syndromic form of HY in Belted Galloway cattle and to identify the causative genetic variant for this recessive disorder. An affected calf born in Switzerland presented with multiple small to large areas of alopecia on the limbs and on the dorsal part of the head, neck, and back. A genome-wide association study using Swiss and US Belted Galloway cattle encompassing 12 cases and 61 controls revealed an association signal on chromosome 29. Homozygosity mapping in a subset of cases refined the HY locus to a 1.5 Mb critical interval and subsequent Sanger sequencing of protein-coding exons of positional candidate genes revealed a stop gain variant in the HEPHL1 gene that encodes a multi-copper ferroxidase protein so-called hephaestin like 1 (c.1684A>T; p.Lys562*). A perfect concordance between the homozygous presence of this most likely pathogenic loss-of-function variant and the HY phenotype was found. Genotyping of more than 700 purebred Swiss and US Belted Galloway cattle showed the global spread of the mutation. This study provides a molecular test that will permit the avoidance of risk matings by systematic genotyping of relevant breeding animals. This rare recessive HEPHL1-related form of hypotrichosis provides a novel large animal model for similar human conditions. The results have been incorporated in the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Animals (OMIA) database (OMIA 002230-9913).
Kuca, Thibaud; Marron, Brandy M.; Jacinto, Joana G. P.; Paris, Julia M.; Gerspach, Christian; Beever, Jonathan E.; Drögemüller, Cord
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
genes-12-00643-v2 (1).pdf

accesso aperto

Tipo: Versione (PDF) editoriale
Licenza: Licenza per Accesso Aperto. Creative Commons Attribuzione (CCBY)
Dimensione 1.39 MB
Formato Adobe PDF
1.39 MB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/819423
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 1
  • Scopus 2
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 2
social impact