Amyloid cardiomyopathy is a condition characterized by intra-myocardial deposit of protein-like material, in fibrillar shape (amyloid), which presence determine a progressive thickening and stiffening of the cardiac walls leading to a cardiac dysfunction. The proteins most often involved with cardiac amyloid are the light chains of the immunoglobulin, typical of amyloidosis AL, and transthyretin, responsible for transthyretin amyloidosis, in both its forms, hereditary and wild type. An accurate estimate of the incidence of cardiac amyloidosis is still difficult due to the variety and complexity of the clinical presentation of the condition. Nonetheless, the condition has stimulated the interest of the scientific community, so that a specific diagnostic path has been developed, beginning from the clinical suspicion and first-line testing, such as electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and blood work, to progress to the diagnostic confirmation using more sophisticated testing such as magnetic resonance, scintiscan, and eventually cardiac biopsy. To understand and recognize this condition is very important, stemming from the availability of 'aetiology oriented therapies' (designed to prevent, control and possibly regress amyloid deposition), which should be added to the 'supportive therapies', used for the treatment of the complication of the condition, namely heart failure.

A new therapy for transthyretin amyloidosis, no longer an orphan condition

Quarta C. C.
Primo
;
Tinuper A. L.
Secondo
;
Milandri A.;Gagliardi C.;Rapezzi C.
Ultimo
2020

Abstract

Amyloid cardiomyopathy is a condition characterized by intra-myocardial deposit of protein-like material, in fibrillar shape (amyloid), which presence determine a progressive thickening and stiffening of the cardiac walls leading to a cardiac dysfunction. The proteins most often involved with cardiac amyloid are the light chains of the immunoglobulin, typical of amyloidosis AL, and transthyretin, responsible for transthyretin amyloidosis, in both its forms, hereditary and wild type. An accurate estimate of the incidence of cardiac amyloidosis is still difficult due to the variety and complexity of the clinical presentation of the condition. Nonetheless, the condition has stimulated the interest of the scientific community, so that a specific diagnostic path has been developed, beginning from the clinical suspicion and first-line testing, such as electrocardiogram, echocardiogram, and blood work, to progress to the diagnostic confirmation using more sophisticated testing such as magnetic resonance, scintiscan, and eventually cardiac biopsy. To understand and recognize this condition is very important, stemming from the availability of 'aetiology oriented therapies' (designed to prevent, control and possibly regress amyloid deposition), which should be added to the 'supportive therapies', used for the treatment of the complication of the condition, namely heart failure.
Quarta C.C.; Tinuper A.L.; Milandri A.; Gagliardi C.; Caponeti G.; Rapezzi C.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/818417
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