Two hemoplasma species are known in dogs: Mycoplasma haemocanis (Mhc) and ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum’ (CMhp). Although their transmission routes are poorly understood, Rhipicephalus sanguineus has been suggested as a potential tick vector. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical importance of canine hemoplasmas in countries with a Mediterranean climate where R. sanguineus is highly prevalent using TaqMan real-time PCR, and to molecularly characterize the identified isolates. DNA (canine glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) was successfully amplified from all samples collected from 850 dogs in Italy, Spain, and Portugal, and 82 (9.6%) were PCR-positive for canine hemoplasmas (43 Mhc, 34 CMhp and 5 co-infected). The hemoplasma sample prevalence was significantly higher in Portugal (40%) than in Italy (9.5%) and Spain (2.5%). Risk factors for infection included living in kennels, young age, crossbreeding, and mange infection. No association was found with anemia. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and RNase P genes revealed >99% identity to other European isolates. In conclusion, canine hemoplasma infections were readily encountered in Mediterranean countries. The climate and living conditions seemed to influence canine hemoplasma prevalence. The clinical importance of canine hemoplasma infections appeared to be low, but the infection stage of the presented dogs was unknown.

Prevalence and geographical distribution of canine hemotropic mycoplasma infections in Mediterranean countries and analysis of risk factors for infection.

GENTILINI, FABIO;
2010

Abstract

Two hemoplasma species are known in dogs: Mycoplasma haemocanis (Mhc) and ‘Candidatus Mycoplasma haematoparvum’ (CMhp). Although their transmission routes are poorly understood, Rhipicephalus sanguineus has been suggested as a potential tick vector. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence, risk factors, and clinical importance of canine hemoplasmas in countries with a Mediterranean climate where R. sanguineus is highly prevalent using TaqMan real-time PCR, and to molecularly characterize the identified isolates. DNA (canine glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) was successfully amplified from all samples collected from 850 dogs in Italy, Spain, and Portugal, and 82 (9.6%) were PCR-positive for canine hemoplasmas (43 Mhc, 34 CMhp and 5 co-infected). The hemoplasma sample prevalence was significantly higher in Portugal (40%) than in Italy (9.5%) and Spain (2.5%). Risk factors for infection included living in kennels, young age, crossbreeding, and mange infection. No association was found with anemia. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA and RNase P genes revealed >99% identity to other European isolates. In conclusion, canine hemoplasma infections were readily encountered in Mediterranean countries. The climate and living conditions seemed to influence canine hemoplasma prevalence. The clinical importance of canine hemoplasma infections appeared to be low, but the infection stage of the presented dogs was unknown.
M. Novacco; M.L. Meli;F Gentilini;F. Marsilio;C. Ceci;M.G. Pennisi ; G. Lombardo;A. Lloret;L. Santos;T. Carrapiço;B. Willi;G. Wolf;H. Lutz; R. Hofmann-Lehmann.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/81639
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