A globular cluster-like system in the Galactic bulge hosts two stellar populations with remarkably different ages, identifying it as a site of recent star formation and providing observational proof for the hierarchical assembly of the Milky Way spheroid.The formation and evolutionary processes of galaxy bulges are still unclear, and the presence of young stars in the bulge of the Milky Way is largely debated. We recently demonstrated that Terzan 5, in the Galactic bulge, is a complex stellar system hosting stars with very different ages and a striking chemical similarity to the field population. This indicates that its progenitor was probably one of the giant structures that are thought to generate bulges through coalescence. Here we show that another globular cluster-like system in the bulge (Liller 1) hosts two distinct stellar populations with remarkably different ages: only 1-3 Gyr for the youngest, and 12 Gyr for the oldest, which is impressively similar to the old component of Terzan 5. This discovery classifies Liller 1 and Terzan 5 as sites of recent star formation in the Galactic bulge and provides clear observational proof that the hierarchical assembly of primordial massive structures contributed to the formation of the Milky Way spheroid.

A new class of fossil fragments from the hierarchical assembly of the Galactic bulge

Ferraro, F. R.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Pallanca, C.
Formal Analysis
;
Lanzoni, B.
Methodology
;
Crociati, C.
Data Curation
;
Mucciarelli, A.
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
2021

Abstract

A globular cluster-like system in the Galactic bulge hosts two stellar populations with remarkably different ages, identifying it as a site of recent star formation and providing observational proof for the hierarchical assembly of the Milky Way spheroid.The formation and evolutionary processes of galaxy bulges are still unclear, and the presence of young stars in the bulge of the Milky Way is largely debated. We recently demonstrated that Terzan 5, in the Galactic bulge, is a complex stellar system hosting stars with very different ages and a striking chemical similarity to the field population. This indicates that its progenitor was probably one of the giant structures that are thought to generate bulges through coalescence. Here we show that another globular cluster-like system in the bulge (Liller 1) hosts two distinct stellar populations with remarkably different ages: only 1-3 Gyr for the youngest, and 12 Gyr for the oldest, which is impressively similar to the old component of Terzan 5. This discovery classifies Liller 1 and Terzan 5 as sites of recent star formation in the Galactic bulge and provides clear observational proof that the hierarchical assembly of primordial massive structures contributed to the formation of the Milky Way spheroid.
Ferraro, F. R.; Pallanca, C.; Lanzoni, B.; Crociati, C.; Dalessandro, E.; Origlia, L.; Rich, R. M.; Saracino, S.; Mucciarelli, A.; Valenti, E.; Geisler, D.; Mauro, F.; Villanova, S.; Moni Bidin, C.; Beccari, G.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/805419
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