BACKGROUND: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a socially and economically relevant disease caused by compression or entrapment of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. This population-based case-control study aims to investigate occupational/non-occupational risk factors for surgically treated CTS. METHODS: Cases (n = 220) aged 18-65 years were randomly drawn from 13 administrative databases of citizens who were surgically treated with carpal tunnel release during 2001. Controls (n = 356) were randomly sampled from National Health Service registry records and were frequency matched by age-gender-specific CTS hospitalization rates. RESULTS: At multivariate analysis, risk factors were blue-collar/housewife status, BMI > or = 30 kg/m2, sibling history of CTS and coexistence of trigger finger. Being relatively tall (cut-offs based on tertiles: women > or =165 cm; men > or =175 cm) was associated with lower risk. Blue-collar work was a moderate/strong risk factor in both sexes. Raised risks were apparent for combinations of biomechanical risk factors that included frequent repetitivity and sustained force. CONCLUSION: This study strongly underlines the relevance of biomechanical exposures in both non-industrial and industrial work as risk factors for surgically treated CTS.

Risk factors for operated carpal tunnel syndrome: a multicenter population-based case-control study.

MATTIOLI, STEFANO;CURTI, STEFANIA;ZANARDI, FRANCESCA;VIOLANTE, FRANCESCO SAVERIO
2009

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a socially and economically relevant disease caused by compression or entrapment of the median nerve within the carpal tunnel. This population-based case-control study aims to investigate occupational/non-occupational risk factors for surgically treated CTS. METHODS: Cases (n = 220) aged 18-65 years were randomly drawn from 13 administrative databases of citizens who were surgically treated with carpal tunnel release during 2001. Controls (n = 356) were randomly sampled from National Health Service registry records and were frequency matched by age-gender-specific CTS hospitalization rates. RESULTS: At multivariate analysis, risk factors were blue-collar/housewife status, BMI > or = 30 kg/m2, sibling history of CTS and coexistence of trigger finger. Being relatively tall (cut-offs based on tertiles: women > or =165 cm; men > or =175 cm) was associated with lower risk. Blue-collar work was a moderate/strong risk factor in both sexes. Raised risks were apparent for combinations of biomechanical risk factors that included frequent repetitivity and sustained force. CONCLUSION: This study strongly underlines the relevance of biomechanical exposures in both non-industrial and industrial work as risk factors for surgically treated CTS.
Mattioli S.; Baldasseroni A.; Bovenzi M.; Curti S.; Cooke R.M.; Campo G.; Barbieri P.G.; Ghersi R.; Broccoli M.; Cancellieri M.P.; Colao A.M.; Dell'omo M.; Fateh-Moghadam P.; Franceschini F.; Fucksia S.; Galli P.; Gobba F.; Lucchini R.; Mandes A.; Marras T.; Sgarrella C.; Borghesi S.; Fierro M.; Zanardi F.; Mancini G.; Violante F.S.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/79706
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