The present work shows how 3D models extracted from a computerised tomography (CT) scan can be processed to be 3D printed into 1:1 orthopedic scale models, which find unquestionable utility in pre-operative surgical planning. Relying on the CAT-CAD methodology, which produces a 3D surface called “mesh” from diagnostic images of body parts, the CAD-AM process elaborates a volumetric bone model which a cost-efficient FDM printer can work with. The suitable materials for these applications are PLA polymers, due to their thermo-mechanical properties, affordability and ecological sustainability; these anatomic 3D printed models allows surgeons to accurately see bones injuries and trauma, resulting in a minimisation of risk and a much more flowing doctor-patient communication. Furthermore these 3D printed objects can be manufactured with specific density in order to simulate bone tissues, resulting in a useful tool through which experienced surgeons can pass on their knowledge to medical students at a very reasonable cost, overcoming the glaring limitations of two-dimensional images provided by CT scans. Here represented is a 3D printed 1:1 scale model of a femur donated to the Bone Bank of IOR-Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute in Bologna.

Description of the cad-am process for 3d bone printing: The case study of a femur

Frizziero L.
Conceptualization
;
Donnici G.
Methodology
;
Liverani A.
Software
;
Santi G.
Investigation
;
Napolitano F.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
2020

Abstract

The present work shows how 3D models extracted from a computerised tomography (CT) scan can be processed to be 3D printed into 1:1 orthopedic scale models, which find unquestionable utility in pre-operative surgical planning. Relying on the CAT-CAD methodology, which produces a 3D surface called “mesh” from diagnostic images of body parts, the CAD-AM process elaborates a volumetric bone model which a cost-efficient FDM printer can work with. The suitable materials for these applications are PLA polymers, due to their thermo-mechanical properties, affordability and ecological sustainability; these anatomic 3D printed models allows surgeons to accurately see bones injuries and trauma, resulting in a minimisation of risk and a much more flowing doctor-patient communication. Furthermore these 3D printed objects can be manufactured with specific density in order to simulate bone tissues, resulting in a useful tool through which experienced surgeons can pass on their knowledge to medical students at a very reasonable cost, overcoming the glaring limitations of two-dimensional images provided by CT scans. Here represented is a 3D printed 1:1 scale model of a femur donated to the Bone Bank of IOR-Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute in Bologna.
Proceedings of the International Conference on Industrial Engineering and Operations Management
2258
2266
Frizziero L.; Donnici G.; Liverani A.; Santi G.; Neri M.; Papaleo P.; Napolitano F.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/794164
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