Background: Regulatory agencies warned against fluoroquinolones for the management of minor infections because of the risk of emerging adverse events (collagen-associated adverse events, neuropsychiatric toxicity and long-term disability). We aimed to assess quality and credibility of evidence as well as causality regarding these putative associations. Methods: MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science and PROSPERO were searched, from inception to August 2019, for systematic reviews with meta-analyses investigating emerging adverse events. Two investigators extracted data to grade quality (through validated AMSTAR-2 tool), rank credibility of the evidence (convincing, highly suggestive, suggestive, weak) through adapted criteria including E-value calculation, and assess causality (Hill's criteria). Results: Seven systematic reviews of observational studies providing 16 risk estimates [seven, five and four, respectively, for aortic aneurysm/dissection (AAD), retinal detachment (RD) and any tendon disorders (ATD)] met inclusion criteria. No systematic reviews with meta-analysis investigating the risk of neuropsychiatric toxicity or long-term disability were found. The associations between fluoroquinolones and AAD/ATD showed highly suggestive credibility and were supported by strong evidence of causality (double increased risk, especially within first 2 months of treatment). Conflicting data concerning the emergence of RD were retrieved, resulting in weak evidence of causality. Quality of the evidence ranged from high to low for AAD, from moderate to critically low for RD, and it was moderate for ATD. Conclusion: Our analysis supports credible, plausible and highly suggestive associations with AAD (rare occurrence but strong causality) and ATD. Limitations of both umbrella reviews and observational evidence should be considered.

Assessing the association between fluoroquinolones and emerging adverse drug reactions raised by regulatory agencies: An umbrella review

Gatti M.;Bianchin M.;Raschi E.
Supervision
;
De Ponti F.
2020

Abstract

Background: Regulatory agencies warned against fluoroquinolones for the management of minor infections because of the risk of emerging adverse events (collagen-associated adverse events, neuropsychiatric toxicity and long-term disability). We aimed to assess quality and credibility of evidence as well as causality regarding these putative associations. Methods: MEDLINE, Scopus, Web of Science and PROSPERO were searched, from inception to August 2019, for systematic reviews with meta-analyses investigating emerging adverse events. Two investigators extracted data to grade quality (through validated AMSTAR-2 tool), rank credibility of the evidence (convincing, highly suggestive, suggestive, weak) through adapted criteria including E-value calculation, and assess causality (Hill's criteria). Results: Seven systematic reviews of observational studies providing 16 risk estimates [seven, five and four, respectively, for aortic aneurysm/dissection (AAD), retinal detachment (RD) and any tendon disorders (ATD)] met inclusion criteria. No systematic reviews with meta-analysis investigating the risk of neuropsychiatric toxicity or long-term disability were found. The associations between fluoroquinolones and AAD/ATD showed highly suggestive credibility and were supported by strong evidence of causality (double increased risk, especially within first 2 months of treatment). Conflicting data concerning the emergence of RD were retrieved, resulting in weak evidence of causality. Quality of the evidence ranged from high to low for AAD, from moderate to critically low for RD, and it was moderate for ATD. Conclusion: Our analysis supports credible, plausible and highly suggestive associations with AAD (rare occurrence but strong causality) and ATD. Limitations of both umbrella reviews and observational evidence should be considered.
Gatti M.; Bianchin M.; Raschi E.; De Ponti F.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/793142
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