Traditional foods have been defined by European consumers as food products that are well-known, that one can eat often and that were eaten already by our grand-parents. Recent surveys have evidenced that in Europe traditional food products (TFPs) are strongly associated with the attributes “good quality”, “consistent quality” and “good taste”. In addition, the common belief of the presence of a special taste in traditional food, together with a positive safety perception, a high nutritional value and healthiness make TFPs a growing segment within the European food market. The present lecture is organized in three main parts which map out the most important issues and challenges. After a brief introduction describing the complex force field of traditional food system, the first part focuses on available literature with the aim to verify the correspondence between the general “healthy” image of TFPs and scientific data. The analysis is carried out distinguishing: 1) traditional ingredients (old vs modern crop/vegetable genotypes); 2) traditional ingredient production (organic vs conventional cropping systems); 3) traditional food preparation (industrial vs traditional bakery). Particular attention is devoted to some controversial aspects of TFPs (ie microbiological and/or toxicological safety assurance systems) in relation to their presumed or demonstrated functional properties. The second part deals with the potential role of traditional foods within the context of the worldwide “double burden” of malnutrition. Within the context of a balanced diet, the role of TFP functional properties in contrasting obesity, food intolerance and some symptoms of malnutrition is discussed. The third part illustrates the main perspectives and challenge of TFPs. Traditional food production has in the past adapted to new circumstances. The question is how TFPs can adapt in the next future to new consumers requirements and to large scale markets. The present and dominant agro-industrial food system, qualified as intensive, specialized, concentrated, financialized and on the road to globalization, deeply contrasts the production model of several traditional foods. Within this context, the role of researchers and technicians in supporting TFPs by providing tools to better understand the ongoing constrains and specific opportunities of the food sector is discussed.

Traditional Food: functional properties and perspectives

DINELLI, GIOVANNI;BIAVATI, BRUNO;DI GIOIA, DIANA;GAGGIA, FRANCESCA;MAROTTI, ILARIA
2009

Abstract

Traditional foods have been defined by European consumers as food products that are well-known, that one can eat often and that were eaten already by our grand-parents. Recent surveys have evidenced that in Europe traditional food products (TFPs) are strongly associated with the attributes “good quality”, “consistent quality” and “good taste”. In addition, the common belief of the presence of a special taste in traditional food, together with a positive safety perception, a high nutritional value and healthiness make TFPs a growing segment within the European food market. The present lecture is organized in three main parts which map out the most important issues and challenges. After a brief introduction describing the complex force field of traditional food system, the first part focuses on available literature with the aim to verify the correspondence between the general “healthy” image of TFPs and scientific data. The analysis is carried out distinguishing: 1) traditional ingredients (old vs modern crop/vegetable genotypes); 2) traditional ingredient production (organic vs conventional cropping systems); 3) traditional food preparation (industrial vs traditional bakery). Particular attention is devoted to some controversial aspects of TFPs (ie microbiological and/or toxicological safety assurance systems) in relation to their presumed or demonstrated functional properties. The second part deals with the potential role of traditional foods within the context of the worldwide “double burden” of malnutrition. Within the context of a balanced diet, the role of TFP functional properties in contrasting obesity, food intolerance and some symptoms of malnutrition is discussed. The third part illustrates the main perspectives and challenge of TFPs. Traditional food production has in the past adapted to new circumstances. The question is how TFPs can adapt in the next future to new consumers requirements and to large scale markets. The present and dominant agro-industrial food system, qualified as intensive, specialized, concentrated, financialized and on the road to globalization, deeply contrasts the production model of several traditional foods. Within this context, the role of researchers and technicians in supporting TFPs by providing tools to better understand the ongoing constrains and specific opportunities of the food sector is discussed.
Proceedings of the International Scientific Conference on Nutraceuticals and Functional Foods
22
23
DINELLI G.; BIAVATI B.; DI GIOIA D.; GAGGIA F.; MAROTTI I.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/78706
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