Background: Lifestyle interventions aimed at weight loss have been associated with improved liver enzymes, reduced intrahepatic triglyceride content, and improved histology (including reduced fibrosis stage). Objective: To revise the evidence on the beneficial effects of lifestyle changes accumulated since 2015, following the publication of the pivotal Cuban experience with histologic outcome. Methods: A PubMed search covering the period 2015 to July 2019 was carried out. All retrieved references were analyzed and double-checked by authors. Results: 20 new studies were identified; in addition, two relevant studies provided new evidence. Thirteen studies were classified as randomized, controlled studies, three as proof-of-concept/pilot studies, four as cohort observational studies. In an attempt to maintain a closer contact between participants and the treatment center, a study implemented regular phone calls, another an e-mail service, a third was based on text messages, and finally, a study was totally web-based. Notably, the web-based treatment, accessed following intense motivational inter-viewing, was not less effective than a standard group-based behavior program. Conclusion: Lifestyle changes should form the basis of any NAFLD intervention. Information technology provides the opportunity to expand treatment, bypassing job and time constraints in younger patients, and to maintain long-term contact between patients and therapists in the NAFLD population.

Lifestyle changes for the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease-a 2015-19 update

Petroni M. L.;Brodosi L.;Barbanti F. A.;Marchesini G.
2020

Abstract

Background: Lifestyle interventions aimed at weight loss have been associated with improved liver enzymes, reduced intrahepatic triglyceride content, and improved histology (including reduced fibrosis stage). Objective: To revise the evidence on the beneficial effects of lifestyle changes accumulated since 2015, following the publication of the pivotal Cuban experience with histologic outcome. Methods: A PubMed search covering the period 2015 to July 2019 was carried out. All retrieved references were analyzed and double-checked by authors. Results: 20 new studies were identified; in addition, two relevant studies provided new evidence. Thirteen studies were classified as randomized, controlled studies, three as proof-of-concept/pilot studies, four as cohort observational studies. In an attempt to maintain a closer contact between participants and the treatment center, a study implemented regular phone calls, another an e-mail service, a third was based on text messages, and finally, a study was totally web-based. Notably, the web-based treatment, accessed following intense motivational inter-viewing, was not less effective than a standard group-based behavior program. Conclusion: Lifestyle changes should form the basis of any NAFLD intervention. Information technology provides the opportunity to expand treatment, bypassing job and time constraints in younger patients, and to maintain long-term contact between patients and therapists in the NAFLD population.
Petroni M.L.; Brodosi L.; Barbanti F.A.; Domizio S.D.; Petta S.; Marchesini G.
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/782762
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 3
  • Scopus 8
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 7
social impact