Background: Controversy exists as to whether low-dose aspirin use may give benefit in primary prevention of cardiovascular (CV) events. We hypothesized that the benefits of aspirin are underevaluated. Methods: We investigated 12,123 Caucasian patients presenting to hospital with acute coronary syndromes as first manifestation of CV disease from 2010 to 2019 in the ISACS-TC multicenter registry (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01218776). Individual risk of ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and its association with 30-day mortality was quantified using inverse probability of treatment weighting models matching for concomitant medications. Estimates were compared by test of interaction on the log scale. Findings: The risk of STEMI was lower in the aspirin users (absolute reduction: 6·8%; OR: 0·73; 95%CI: 0·65–0·82) regardless of sex (p for interaction=0·1962) or age (p for interaction=0·1209). Benefits of aspirin were seen in patients with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and in smokers. In contrast, aspirin failed to demonstrate a significant risk reduction in STEMI among diabetic patients (OR:1·10;95%CI:0·89–1·35) with a significant interaction (p: <0·0001) when compared with controls (OR:0·64,95%CI:0·56–0·73). Stratification of diabetes in risk categories revealed benefits (p interaction=0·0864) only in patients with concomitant hypertension and hypercholesterolemia (OR:0·87, 95% CI:0·65–1·15), but not in smokers. STEMI was strongly related to 30-day mortality (OR:1·93; 95%CI:1·59–2·35) Interpretation: Low-dose aspirin reduces the risk of STEMI as initial manifestation of CV disease with potential benefit in mortality. Patients with diabetes derive substantial benefit from aspirin only in the presence of multiple risk factors. In the era of precision medicine, a more tailored strategy is required. Funding: None.

Aspirin for primary prevention of ST segment elevation myocardial infarction in persons with diabetes and multiple risk factors

Bugiardini R.
;
Bergami M.;Manfrini O.;Cenko E.;
2020

Abstract

Background: Controversy exists as to whether low-dose aspirin use may give benefit in primary prevention of cardiovascular (CV) events. We hypothesized that the benefits of aspirin are underevaluated. Methods: We investigated 12,123 Caucasian patients presenting to hospital with acute coronary syndromes as first manifestation of CV disease from 2010 to 2019 in the ISACS-TC multicenter registry (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01218776). Individual risk of ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and its association with 30-day mortality was quantified using inverse probability of treatment weighting models matching for concomitant medications. Estimates were compared by test of interaction on the log scale. Findings: The risk of STEMI was lower in the aspirin users (absolute reduction: 6·8%; OR: 0·73; 95%CI: 0·65–0·82) regardless of sex (p for interaction=0·1962) or age (p for interaction=0·1209). Benefits of aspirin were seen in patients with hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, and in smokers. In contrast, aspirin failed to demonstrate a significant risk reduction in STEMI among diabetic patients (OR:1·10;95%CI:0·89–1·35) with a significant interaction (p: <0·0001) when compared with controls (OR:0·64,95%CI:0·56–0·73). Stratification of diabetes in risk categories revealed benefits (p interaction=0·0864) only in patients with concomitant hypertension and hypercholesterolemia (OR:0·87, 95% CI:0·65–1·15), but not in smokers. STEMI was strongly related to 30-day mortality (OR:1·93; 95%CI:1·59–2·35) Interpretation: Low-dose aspirin reduces the risk of STEMI as initial manifestation of CV disease with potential benefit in mortality. Patients with diabetes derive substantial benefit from aspirin only in the presence of multiple risk factors. In the era of precision medicine, a more tailored strategy is required. Funding: None.
Bugiardini R.; Pavasovic S.; Yoon J.; van der Schaar M.; Kedev S.; Vavlukis M.; Vasiljevic Z.; Bergami M.; Milicic D.; Manfrini O.; Cenko E.; Badimon L.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/778304
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