Background: Percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of adrenal gland lesions is controversial in veterinary medicine. Objective: To evaluate the frequency and radiologists' perception of the risk of the procedure as well as determining the incidence of complications. Methods: Retrospective study. A first survey was submitted by e-mail to all board-certified radiologists of the American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVR) and European College of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging (ECVDI). A second survey was sent to radiologists who declared having performed the procedure at least once in their career (observational cross-sectional case study). Results: The first survey was sent to 977 diplomates and answered by 138. Of 138 diplomates, 40 currently performed the procedure and 98 did not; 44 of the 98 gave the hypertensive crisis risk in pheochromocytoma as a reason. To the second survey, 12 of 65 responded positively; 50 dogs with 58 lesions were recruited, including 23 pheochromocytomas. Complications were reported in 4 of 50 dogs; 3 hemorrhages (1 mild and 1 moderate) and 1 death from acute respiratory distress syndrome (possibly related to laryngeal paralysis). No hypertensive crisis was reported. There was no relationship between the method of FNA/type of needle used and occurrence of complications. Based on the recollection of these 65 radiologists, who performed approximately 200 FNA of adrenal lesions, a death rate of approximately 1% was estimated. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Percutaneous US-guided FNA of adrenal lesions can be considered a minimally risky procedure, despite the negative perception by radiologists.

Safety of percutaneous ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration of adrenal lesions in dogs: Perception of the procedure by radiologists and presentation of 50 cases

Pey P.;Diana A.
;
Fracassi F.
2020

Abstract

Background: Percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) of adrenal gland lesions is controversial in veterinary medicine. Objective: To evaluate the frequency and radiologists' perception of the risk of the procedure as well as determining the incidence of complications. Methods: Retrospective study. A first survey was submitted by e-mail to all board-certified radiologists of the American College of Veterinary Radiology (ACVR) and European College of Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging (ECVDI). A second survey was sent to radiologists who declared having performed the procedure at least once in their career (observational cross-sectional case study). Results: The first survey was sent to 977 diplomates and answered by 138. Of 138 diplomates, 40 currently performed the procedure and 98 did not; 44 of the 98 gave the hypertensive crisis risk in pheochromocytoma as a reason. To the second survey, 12 of 65 responded positively; 50 dogs with 58 lesions were recruited, including 23 pheochromocytomas. Complications were reported in 4 of 50 dogs; 3 hemorrhages (1 mild and 1 moderate) and 1 death from acute respiratory distress syndrome (possibly related to laryngeal paralysis). No hypertensive crisis was reported. There was no relationship between the method of FNA/type of needle used and occurrence of complications. Based on the recollection of these 65 radiologists, who performed approximately 200 FNA of adrenal lesions, a death rate of approximately 1% was estimated. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Percutaneous US-guided FNA of adrenal lesions can be considered a minimally risky procedure, despite the negative perception by radiologists.
Pey P.; Diana A.; Rossi F.; Mortier J.; Kafka U.; Veraa S.; Groth A.; MacLellan M.; Marin C.; Fracassi F.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/777965
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