The arterial supply of the cat jejunum was studied by gross dissection and polyurethane corrosion cast. The results showed that the jejunal arteries, which originate from the cranial mesenteric artery, varied from 5 to 15 in number. Their number was independent of the length of the cranial mesenteric artery as well as of the length of the jejunum. These arteries divided into branches giving rise to a series of orders of division from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 7. The last orders of division terminated in a series of anastomosing arcades which resulted in a marginal artery coursing only a few millimeters from the mesenteric margin of the jejunum. This artery gave rise to straight arteries (vasa recta), whose mean number was 450 ± 60. According to their length, the vasa recta can be differentiated into short (vasa brevia) and long (vasa longa) branches. The vasa brevia ended branching into the mesenteric side of the jejunum whereas the vasa longa coursed beneath the serosa on the lateral jejunal surfaces, and reached the antimesenteric border. During their course, the vasa recta ramified and anastomosed with each other. Numerous antimesenteric anastomoses between opposing vasa longa were also observed. Based on the literature consulted, due to the large number of vasa recta (approximately one vessel per 2.9 mm of jejunal length) and the rich anastomotic network, the cat jejunum might have a better intramural distribution of blood flow and would seem less predisposed to ischemic phenomena than that of other mammals.

The distribution of the jejunal arteries in the cat

Grandis A.;Canova M.;Tagliavia C.;De Silva M.;Mazzoni M.;Diana A.;Bombardi C.
2021

Abstract

The arterial supply of the cat jejunum was studied by gross dissection and polyurethane corrosion cast. The results showed that the jejunal arteries, which originate from the cranial mesenteric artery, varied from 5 to 15 in number. Their number was independent of the length of the cranial mesenteric artery as well as of the length of the jejunum. These arteries divided into branches giving rise to a series of orders of division from a minimum of 1 to a maximum of 7. The last orders of division terminated in a series of anastomosing arcades which resulted in a marginal artery coursing only a few millimeters from the mesenteric margin of the jejunum. This artery gave rise to straight arteries (vasa recta), whose mean number was 450 ± 60. According to their length, the vasa recta can be differentiated into short (vasa brevia) and long (vasa longa) branches. The vasa brevia ended branching into the mesenteric side of the jejunum whereas the vasa longa coursed beneath the serosa on the lateral jejunal surfaces, and reached the antimesenteric border. During their course, the vasa recta ramified and anastomosed with each other. Numerous antimesenteric anastomoses between opposing vasa longa were also observed. Based on the literature consulted, due to the large number of vasa recta (approximately one vessel per 2.9 mm of jejunal length) and the rich anastomotic network, the cat jejunum might have a better intramural distribution of blood flow and would seem less predisposed to ischemic phenomena than that of other mammals.
Grandis A.; Canova M.; Tagliavia C.; Spiteri J.; Fagnoli H.; De Silva M.; Mazzoni M.; Diana A.; Bombardi C.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/777022
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