The aim of the present investigation was to assess the effect of long-term recreational swimming training on the cardiac autonomic responses in the healthy population. 70 habitual recreational swimmers (48.6±14.3 yrs.) and 60 sedentary adults (51.5±10.4 yrs.) were recruited. Arterial blood pressure was recorded with participants in supine position for 10 min, and the last 5 min were used to assess heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity, and hemodynamic analysis. The analysis of the questionnaire showed that the swimmers had practiced swimming for a mean of 14 years and 207 min/week. No difference was detected for body mass index between groups. Heart rate variability showed significant differences between groups both in the time and frequency domain analysis. We also found significant differences for baroreflex sensitivity. At rest, cardiac output and stroke volume were higher, whereas, heart rate, mean arterial pressure and total peripheral resistances were lower in the swimmers than in the sedentary subjects. Since heart rate variability measures are independent predictors of mortality, the present findings suggest that habitual recreational swimming may be protective against sudden cardiovascular events and, more in general, have a positive impact on cardiovascular health.

Lifetime Exposure to Recreational Swimming Training and its Effects on Autonomic Responses

Piras, Alessandro;Cortesi, Matteo;Di Michele, Rocco;Trofè, Aurelio;Raffi, Milena
2021

Abstract

The aim of the present investigation was to assess the effect of long-term recreational swimming training on the cardiac autonomic responses in the healthy population. 70 habitual recreational swimmers (48.6±14.3 yrs.) and 60 sedentary adults (51.5±10.4 yrs.) were recruited. Arterial blood pressure was recorded with participants in supine position for 10 min, and the last 5 min were used to assess heart rate variability, baroreflex sensitivity, and hemodynamic analysis. The analysis of the questionnaire showed that the swimmers had practiced swimming for a mean of 14 years and 207 min/week. No difference was detected for body mass index between groups. Heart rate variability showed significant differences between groups both in the time and frequency domain analysis. We also found significant differences for baroreflex sensitivity. At rest, cardiac output and stroke volume were higher, whereas, heart rate, mean arterial pressure and total peripheral resistances were lower in the swimmers than in the sedentary subjects. Since heart rate variability measures are independent predictors of mortality, the present findings suggest that habitual recreational swimming may be protective against sudden cardiovascular events and, more in general, have a positive impact on cardiovascular health.
Piras, Alessandro; Cortesi, Matteo; Di Michele, Rocco; Trofè, Aurelio; Raffi, Milena
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/776796
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