In recent years, there has been an increasing interest towards the augmented reality as applied to the surgical field. We conducted a systematic review of literature classifying the augmented reality applications in oral and cranio-maxillofacial surgery (OCMS) in order to pave the way to future solutions that may ease the adoption of AR guidance in surgical practice. Publications containing the terms 'augmented reality' AND 'maxillofacial surgery', and the terms 'augmented reality' AND 'oral surgery' were searched in the PubMed database. Through the selected studies, we performed a preliminary breakdown according to general aspects, such as surgical subspecialty, year of publication and country of research; then, a more specific breakdown was provided according to technical features of AR-based devices, such as virtual data source, visualization processing mode, tracking mode, registration technique and AR display type. The systematic search identified 30 eligible publications. Most studies (14) were in orthognatic surgery, the minority (2) concerned traumatology, while 6 studies were in oncology and 8 in general OCMS. In 8 of 30 studies the AR systems were based on a head-mounted approach using smart glasses or headsets. In most of these cases (7), a video-see-through mode was implemented, while only 1 study described an optical-see-through mode. In the remaining 22 studies, the AR content was displayed on 2D displays (10), full-parallax 3D displays (6) and projectors (5). In 1 case the AR display type is not specified. AR applications are of increasing interest and adoption in oral and cranio-maxillofacial surgery, however, the quality of the AR experience represents the key requisite for a successful result. Widespread use of AR systems in the operating room may be encouraged by the availability of 'surgery-specific' head-mounted devices that should guarantee the accuracy required for surgical tasks and the optimal ergonomics.

Review on Augmented Reality in Oral and Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery: Toward 'Surgery-Specific' Head-Up Displays

Badiali G.;Cercenelli L.;Battaglia S.;Marcelli E.;Marchetti C.;
2020

Abstract

In recent years, there has been an increasing interest towards the augmented reality as applied to the surgical field. We conducted a systematic review of literature classifying the augmented reality applications in oral and cranio-maxillofacial surgery (OCMS) in order to pave the way to future solutions that may ease the adoption of AR guidance in surgical practice. Publications containing the terms 'augmented reality' AND 'maxillofacial surgery', and the terms 'augmented reality' AND 'oral surgery' were searched in the PubMed database. Through the selected studies, we performed a preliminary breakdown according to general aspects, such as surgical subspecialty, year of publication and country of research; then, a more specific breakdown was provided according to technical features of AR-based devices, such as virtual data source, visualization processing mode, tracking mode, registration technique and AR display type. The systematic search identified 30 eligible publications. Most studies (14) were in orthognatic surgery, the minority (2) concerned traumatology, while 6 studies were in oncology and 8 in general OCMS. In 8 of 30 studies the AR systems were based on a head-mounted approach using smart glasses or headsets. In most of these cases (7), a video-see-through mode was implemented, while only 1 study described an optical-see-through mode. In the remaining 22 studies, the AR content was displayed on 2D displays (10), full-parallax 3D displays (6) and projectors (5). In 1 case the AR display type is not specified. AR applications are of increasing interest and adoption in oral and cranio-maxillofacial surgery, however, the quality of the AR experience represents the key requisite for a successful result. Widespread use of AR systems in the operating room may be encouraged by the availability of 'surgery-specific' head-mounted devices that should guarantee the accuracy required for surgical tasks and the optimal ergonomics.
Badiali G.; Cercenelli L.; Battaglia S.; Marcelli E.; Marchetti C.; Ferrari V.; Cutolo F.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/774251
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