Purpose of review: The review aims to describe the differences between men and women in those factors that can influence a worse prognosis in women after an acute cardiovascular event. Recent findings: Women adequately treated with current evidence-based medications for acute myocardial infarction and for conventional cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and dyslipidemia, still have an extra risk of death compared with men. Additional factors that increase the risk of poor prognosis for the index event have been identified. The residual risk can be due to factors affecting the prognosis of the women from outside (they are external to the patient's body) and also to factors that, on the contrary, belong to the female body (female being/female sex). The review will give an update on those residual risk factors, including young age, vulnerability for de novo heart failure, time from symptom onset to treatment, heath care delivered during the weekend, and depression, which generally negatively influence the outcome of women with an acute myocardial infarction.

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review aims to describe the differences between men and women in those factors that can influence a worse prognosis in women after an acute cardiovascular event. RECENT FINDINGS: Women adequately treated with current evidence-based medications for acute myocardial infarction and for conventional cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and dyslipidemia, still have an extra risk of death compared with men. Additional factors that increase the risk of poor prognosis for the index event have been identified. The residual risk can be due to factors affecting the prognosis of the women from outside (they are external to the patient's body) and also to factors that, on the contrary, belong to the female body (female being/female sex). The review will give an update on those residual risk factors, including young age, vulnerability for de novo heart failure, time from symptom onset to treatment, heath care delivered during the weekend, and depression, which generally negatively influence the outcome of women with an acute myocardial infarction.

Gender Differences in Residual Risk Factors for Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events Following ACS and How to Bridge the Gap

Manfrini O.;Cenko E.;Bugiardini R.
2020

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review aims to describe the differences between men and women in those factors that can influence a worse prognosis in women after an acute cardiovascular event. RECENT FINDINGS: Women adequately treated with current evidence-based medications for acute myocardial infarction and for conventional cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, diabetes, smoking, and dyslipidemia, still have an extra risk of death compared with men. Additional factors that increase the risk of poor prognosis for the index event have been identified. The residual risk can be due to factors affecting the prognosis of the women from outside (they are external to the patient's body) and also to factors that, on the contrary, belong to the female body (female being/female sex). The review will give an update on those residual risk factors, including young age, vulnerability for de novo heart failure, time from symptom onset to treatment, heath care delivered during the weekend, and depression, which generally negatively influence the outcome of women with an acute myocardial infarction.
2020
Manfrini O.; Cenko E.; Bugiardini R.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/772907
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