It is reported that sleep enhances prospective memory (PM), but it remains to be understood whether this influence is moderated by age, since sleep changes across the lifespan. To this end, we performed a retrospective study in a naturalistic setting in a large life span sample: 397 healthy participants (227 females) from middle childhood (nine years old) to late adulthood (70 years old). Participants were requested to perform a naturalistic activity-based PM task, namely, to remember to press the event-marker button of an actigraph when they went to bed (activity 1) and when they got out of bed (activity 2) after nocturnal sleep. The percentages of button presses were the measure of our activity-based PM task. For activities 1 and 2, we separately performed a moderation model with actigraphic sleep parameters (sleep efficiency, midpoint of sleep, and total sleep time) as predictors of PM performance with age as a moderator factor. With reference to activity 1, we observed a significant interaction between sleep efficiency and age, showing a decrease in PM performance with the increase in sleep efficiency in the low age group. Only age was a significant (negative) predictor of PM in activity 2, i.e., with increasing age, PM performance significantly decreased. The present study shows, in a large life span sample, that sleep does not seem to play a relevant predictive role of activity-based PM performance.

Prospective memory, sleep, and age

Occhionero M.;Tonetti L.;Boreggiani M.;Martoni M.;Giovagnoli S.;Natale V.
2020

Abstract

It is reported that sleep enhances prospective memory (PM), but it remains to be understood whether this influence is moderated by age, since sleep changes across the lifespan. To this end, we performed a retrospective study in a naturalistic setting in a large life span sample: 397 healthy participants (227 females) from middle childhood (nine years old) to late adulthood (70 years old). Participants were requested to perform a naturalistic activity-based PM task, namely, to remember to press the event-marker button of an actigraph when they went to bed (activity 1) and when they got out of bed (activity 2) after nocturnal sleep. The percentages of button presses were the measure of our activity-based PM task. For activities 1 and 2, we separately performed a moderation model with actigraphic sleep parameters (sleep efficiency, midpoint of sleep, and total sleep time) as predictors of PM performance with age as a moderator factor. With reference to activity 1, we observed a significant interaction between sleep efficiency and age, showing a decrease in PM performance with the increase in sleep efficiency in the low age group. Only age was a significant (negative) predictor of PM in activity 2, i.e., with increasing age, PM performance significantly decreased. The present study shows, in a large life span sample, that sleep does not seem to play a relevant predictive role of activity-based PM performance.
Occhionero M.; Tonetti L.; Fabbri M.; Boreggiani M.; Martoni M.; Giovagnoli S.; Natale V.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/768376
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