Developmental literature highlights that cognitive, moral, and affective development proceeds from concrete operations to more abstract ones. However, it is not known whether this fundamental developmental trajectory also characterizes the development of social identification (i.e., the feelings of belonging, affiliation, and correctness to a group, coupled with the sense of commonality with fellow ingroup members). This longitudinal study aimed (a) to unfold the association between identifications with two proximal groups (i.e., classmates and friends) and identification with humanity, and (b) to examine how these identifications with close and abstract groups affect adolescents’ social well-being (i.e., an indicator of youth adaptation in their societies and communities). Participants were 304 adolescents (61.84% female, Mage = 17.49) involved in a three-wave longitudinal study. Identification with proximal social groups (especially classmates) was positively associated with identification with humanity, and identifications with both proximal and abstract groups were related to social well-being over time. Moreover, identification with humanity and identification with friends mediated the positive longitudinal effects of identification with classmates on social well-being. The implications of these findings for adolescents’ social inclusivity and adjustment are discussed.

Developing Identification with Humanity and Social Well-Being Through Social Identification with Peer Groups in Adolescence

flavia albarello;Elisabetta Crocetti;Monica Rubini
2021

Abstract

Developmental literature highlights that cognitive, moral, and affective development proceeds from concrete operations to more abstract ones. However, it is not known whether this fundamental developmental trajectory also characterizes the development of social identification (i.e., the feelings of belonging, affiliation, and correctness to a group, coupled with the sense of commonality with fellow ingroup members). This longitudinal study aimed (a) to unfold the association between identifications with two proximal groups (i.e., classmates and friends) and identification with humanity, and (b) to examine how these identifications with close and abstract groups affect adolescents’ social well-being (i.e., an indicator of youth adaptation in their societies and communities). Participants were 304 adolescents (61.84% female, Mage = 17.49) involved in a three-wave longitudinal study. Identification with proximal social groups (especially classmates) was positively associated with identification with humanity, and identifications with both proximal and abstract groups were related to social well-being over time. Moreover, identification with humanity and identification with friends mediated the positive longitudinal effects of identification with classmates on social well-being. The implications of these findings for adolescents’ social inclusivity and adjustment are discussed.
flavia albarello, Elisabetta Crocetti, Monica Rubini
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/746682
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 2
  • Scopus 8
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 10
social impact