This article deals with the topic of temporality in Steve Reich’s early works, starting from the analysis of It’s Gonna Rain’s sketches held at the Paul Sacher Stiftung. It will demonstrate that the technique of phasing came out of an idea of composing and de-composing spatial structures, rather than of a simple mistake or of technological needs. The notion of spatialization of music writing, aiming at the creation of temporal perceptual paradoxes, will be put into relationship with a vectorial, but non-protensive and endless conception of musical time.

Vectoriality and protension vs symmetries and endless processes in minimalist music: some reflections stemming from the analysis of the sketches of Steve Reich’s "It’s gonna Rain"

ALBERT G
2016

Abstract

This article deals with the topic of temporality in Steve Reich’s early works, starting from the analysis of It’s Gonna Rain’s sketches held at the Paul Sacher Stiftung. It will demonstrate that the technique of phasing came out of an idea of composing and de-composing spatial structures, rather than of a simple mistake or of technological needs. The notion of spatialization of music writing, aiming at the creation of temporal perceptual paradoxes, will be put into relationship with a vectorial, but non-protensive and endless conception of musical time.
ALBERT G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/743734
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