Purpose - The paper's purpose is to investigate the concept of integrated thinking as part of the International Integrated Reporting Council's (IIRC's) Integrated Reporting () framework. It explores integrated thinking as a cultural control and analyses how it operates. Design/methodology/approach - The paper presents a case study of ResBank (a pseudonym), a small Australian bank, which is participating in the IIRC's Pilot Programme Business Network. ResBank issued its first integrated report in 2012. Using semi-structured interviews, we examine whether integrated thinking develops as espoused by the IIRC. Findings - In ResBank's case, we find that the responsible banking culture that was in place prior to joining the Pilot Programme is a stronger cultural control, alongside personnel, results and action controls. The implication for the IIRC is that integrated thinking clashes with the existing organisational culture rather than driving a new organisational culture. Practical implications - If integrated thinking is to prevail, it may become a source of inertia rather than change because it advocates that an entire workforce should think the same way. We also question whether breaking down silos, as advocated by integrated thinking, is necessary across all organisational functions, especially concerning material organisational risks and reputation, because these silos foster independent thinking. Social implications - The problem with the arguments proposed by the IIRC is that they aim at a onesize- fits-All approach. Not every organisation has a disconnection between strategy, governance, past performance and future prospects nor do they all have disconnected departments that need reconnecting. Therefore, a fundamental problem with is that the IIRC argues 'why' companies need , not 'how' to implement , and especially not 'how' to operationalise integrated thinking. Originality/value - The paper is a must-read because it contributes to the growing debate on the benefits of by examining and critiquing an early adopter's practice.

Integrated thinking as a cultural control?

Dumay J.
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
2017

Abstract

Purpose - The paper's purpose is to investigate the concept of integrated thinking as part of the International Integrated Reporting Council's (IIRC's) Integrated Reporting () framework. It explores integrated thinking as a cultural control and analyses how it operates. Design/methodology/approach - The paper presents a case study of ResBank (a pseudonym), a small Australian bank, which is participating in the IIRC's Pilot Programme Business Network. ResBank issued its first integrated report in 2012. Using semi-structured interviews, we examine whether integrated thinking develops as espoused by the IIRC. Findings - In ResBank's case, we find that the responsible banking culture that was in place prior to joining the Pilot Programme is a stronger cultural control, alongside personnel, results and action controls. The implication for the IIRC is that integrated thinking clashes with the existing organisational culture rather than driving a new organisational culture. Practical implications - If integrated thinking is to prevail, it may become a source of inertia rather than change because it advocates that an entire workforce should think the same way. We also question whether breaking down silos, as advocated by integrated thinking, is necessary across all organisational functions, especially concerning material organisational risks and reputation, because these silos foster independent thinking. Social implications - The problem with the arguments proposed by the IIRC is that they aim at a onesize- fits-All approach. Not every organisation has a disconnection between strategy, governance, past performance and future prospects nor do they all have disconnected departments that need reconnecting. Therefore, a fundamental problem with is that the IIRC argues 'why' companies need , not 'how' to implement , and especially not 'how' to operationalise integrated thinking. Originality/value - The paper is a must-read because it contributes to the growing debate on the benefits of by examining and critiquing an early adopter's practice.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/741177
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