Cortical activity in frontal, parietal, and motor regions during sequence observation correlates with performance on sequence reproduction. Increased cortical activity observed during observation has therefore been suggested to represent increased learning. Causal relationships have been demonstrated between M1 and motor sequence reproduction and between parietal cortex and bimanual learning. However, similar effects have not been reported for frontal regions despite a number of reports implicating its involvement in encoding of motor sequences. Investigating causal relations between cortical activity and reproduction of motor sequences in parietal, frontal and primary motor regions can disentangle whether specific regions during simple observation can be selectively ascribed to encoding or reproduction or both. We designed a sensorimotor paradigm that included a strong motor sequence component, and tested the impact of individually adjusted transcranial alternating current stimulation (IAF-tACS) to prefrontal, parietal, and primary motor regions on electroencephalographic motor rhythms (alpha and beta bandwidths) during motor sequence observation and the ability to reproduce the observed sequences. Independently of the stimulated region, IAF-tACS led to a reduction in suppression in the lower beta-range relative to sham. Prefrontal IAF-tACS however, led to significant improvement in motor sequence reproduction, pinpointing the crucial role of prefrontal regions in motor sequence reproduction.

Prefrontal transcranial alternating current stimulation improves motor sequence reproduction

Romei V.
2019

Abstract

Cortical activity in frontal, parietal, and motor regions during sequence observation correlates with performance on sequence reproduction. Increased cortical activity observed during observation has therefore been suggested to represent increased learning. Causal relationships have been demonstrated between M1 and motor sequence reproduction and between parietal cortex and bimanual learning. However, similar effects have not been reported for frontal regions despite a number of reports implicating its involvement in encoding of motor sequences. Investigating causal relations between cortical activity and reproduction of motor sequences in parietal, frontal and primary motor regions can disentangle whether specific regions during simple observation can be selectively ascribed to encoding or reproduction or both. We designed a sensorimotor paradigm that included a strong motor sequence component, and tested the impact of individually adjusted transcranial alternating current stimulation (IAF-tACS) to prefrontal, parietal, and primary motor regions on electroencephalographic motor rhythms (alpha and beta bandwidths) during motor sequence observation and the ability to reproduce the observed sequences. Independently of the stimulated region, IAF-tACS led to a reduction in suppression in the lower beta-range relative to sham. Prefrontal IAF-tACS however, led to significant improvement in motor sequence reproduction, pinpointing the crucial role of prefrontal regions in motor sequence reproduction.
Berntsen M.B.; Cooper N.R.; Hughes G.; Romei V.
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/736943
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 3
  • Scopus 3
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 3
social impact