Grasp-related responses in neurons of the macaque rostral inferior parietal lobule [PF/PFG and the anterior intraparietal area (AIP)] are modulated by task context. Event-related functional MRI was used to determine whether this is true in putative homologs of the human cortex, the rostral inferior parietal lobule (rIPL) and the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS). Fifteen healthy, right-handed adults were required to select prospectively the most comfortable way to grasp a horizontally oriented handle using the cued hand (left or right). In the “no-rotation” condition, the task was simply to grasp the handle, whereas in the “rotation” condition, the goal was to plan to grasp and rotate it into a vertical orientation with the cued end (medial or lateral) pointing downward. In both conditions, participants remained still and indicated their grip preferences by pressing foot pedals. As in overt grasping, participants’ grip preferences were significantly influenced by anticipation of the demands associated with handle rotation. Activity within the aIPS and rIPL increased bilaterally in both the rotation and no-rotation conditions. Importantly, these responses were significantly greater in the rotation vs. no-rotation condition. Similar context effects were detected in the presupplementary motor area, caudal intraparietal sulcus/ superior parietal lobule, and bilateral dorsal and left ventral premotor cortices. Grasp representations within the rIPL and aIPS are sensitive to predicted task demands and play a role in context-sensitive grip selection. Moreover, the findings provide additional evidence that areas involved in the sensorimotor control of grasp also contribute to feedforward planning.

Evidence for context sensitivity of grasp representations in human parietal and premotor cortices

M. Marangon;
2011

Abstract

Grasp-related responses in neurons of the macaque rostral inferior parietal lobule [PF/PFG and the anterior intraparietal area (AIP)] are modulated by task context. Event-related functional MRI was used to determine whether this is true in putative homologs of the human cortex, the rostral inferior parietal lobule (rIPL) and the anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS). Fifteen healthy, right-handed adults were required to select prospectively the most comfortable way to grasp a horizontally oriented handle using the cued hand (left or right). In the “no-rotation” condition, the task was simply to grasp the handle, whereas in the “rotation” condition, the goal was to plan to grasp and rotate it into a vertical orientation with the cued end (medial or lateral) pointing downward. In both conditions, participants remained still and indicated their grip preferences by pressing foot pedals. As in overt grasping, participants’ grip preferences were significantly influenced by anticipation of the demands associated with handle rotation. Activity within the aIPS and rIPL increased bilaterally in both the rotation and no-rotation conditions. Importantly, these responses were significantly greater in the rotation vs. no-rotation condition. Similar context effects were detected in the presupplementary motor area, caudal intraparietal sulcus/ superior parietal lobule, and bilateral dorsal and left ventral premotor cortices. Grasp representations within the rIPL and aIPS are sensitive to predicted task demands and play a role in context-sensitive grip selection. Moreover, the findings provide additional evidence that areas involved in the sensorimotor control of grasp also contribute to feedforward planning.
JOURNAL OF NEUROPHYSIOLOGY
M. Marangon; S. Jacobs; S. H. Frey
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/724833
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