Background: Improvement in cardiac function has been demonstrated after thyroxine treatment in humans with hypothyroidism using the myocardial performance index (MPI). Cardiac changes after thyroxine supplementation are poorly documented in dogs with spontaneous hypothyroidism and comparison with clinically healthy dogs is lacking. Objectives: To evaluate the electrical activity and mechanical function of the heart in dogs with primary hypothyroidism at baseline (T0) and after thyroxine supplementation (T60). Animals: Forty client-owned dogs with hypothyroidism and 20 clinically healthy dogs. Methods: Prospective cohort study. Selected electrocardiographic and echocardiographic variables, including the MPI, were measured in all dogs at T0 and in 30 hypothyroid dogs at T60. Results: Hypothyroid dogs had significantly decreased median or mean heart rate (HR), P wave amplitude, and R wave amplitude (P =.04, P =.002, and P =.003, respectively) and E-point-to-septal separation normalized to body weight (EPSSn) and trans-mitral E wave velocity (E max; P <.001 and P =.025, respectively) at T0 compared to control dogs. At T60, significantly increased median or mean HR, P wave amplitude, fractional shortening, and E max (P <.001, P =.004, P =.002, and P =.009, respectively) and significantly decreased left ventricular end-diastolic volume index, and normalized systolic diameter and EPSSn (P =.03, P =.03, and P =.001, respectively) were found. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Hypothyroidism in dogs induces mild and reversible changes of electromechanical cardiac function. The MPI does not have clinical importance in identifying cardiac dysfunction in affected dogs.

Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic evaluation in dogs with hypothyroidism before and after levothyroxine supplementation: A prospective controlled study

Guglielmini C.;Fracassi F.;Baron Toaldo M.
2019

Abstract

Background: Improvement in cardiac function has been demonstrated after thyroxine treatment in humans with hypothyroidism using the myocardial performance index (MPI). Cardiac changes after thyroxine supplementation are poorly documented in dogs with spontaneous hypothyroidism and comparison with clinically healthy dogs is lacking. Objectives: To evaluate the electrical activity and mechanical function of the heart in dogs with primary hypothyroidism at baseline (T0) and after thyroxine supplementation (T60). Animals: Forty client-owned dogs with hypothyroidism and 20 clinically healthy dogs. Methods: Prospective cohort study. Selected electrocardiographic and echocardiographic variables, including the MPI, were measured in all dogs at T0 and in 30 hypothyroid dogs at T60. Results: Hypothyroid dogs had significantly decreased median or mean heart rate (HR), P wave amplitude, and R wave amplitude (P =.04, P =.002, and P =.003, respectively) and E-point-to-septal separation normalized to body weight (EPSSn) and trans-mitral E wave velocity (E max; P <.001 and P =.025, respectively) at T0 compared to control dogs. At T60, significantly increased median or mean HR, P wave amplitude, fractional shortening, and E max (P <.001, P =.004, P =.002, and P =.009, respectively) and significantly decreased left ventricular end-diastolic volume index, and normalized systolic diameter and EPSSn (P =.03, P =.03, and P =.001, respectively) were found. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Hypothyroidism in dogs induces mild and reversible changes of electromechanical cardiac function. The MPI does not have clinical importance in identifying cardiac dysfunction in affected dogs.
Guglielmini C.; Berlanda M.; Fracassi F.; Poser H.; Koren S.; Baron Toaldo M.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/724293
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