Background Although guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology and American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology recommend early percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in all patients with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction/ unstable angina (NSTE-ACS), in day-to-day practice persists uncertainty as to whether to follow guidelines in patients aged 75 years or older. Indeed, recommendations are based on large randomized trials where patients aged 75 years or older are under-represented. Purpose We aimed to investigate whether patients aged 75 years or older would benefit from an early invasive strategy versus a conservative strategy. We also analyzed the factors associated with the choice of an early PCI in this population. Methods The research was conducted on the population of the International Survey of Acute Coronary Syndromes (ISACS-TC) registry. The study population consisted of 6826 eligible patients with NSTE-ACS. Of these patients, 1496 were 75 years old or older and were included in the analysis. The primary outcome measure was 30-day mortality. Key secondary outcomes were bleeding complications during the index hospitalization. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to establish outcomes and factors associated with outcomes. We evaluated specific ranges of ages: 75–79 years, 80–84 years, and 85 years or over. Further, data were sorted by sex and diabetes mellitus status. Results The mean age of our study population was 80.0 (interquartile range: 77–82) years old. Elderly patients treated with early PCI and medical therapy were significantly younger than those treated with only medical therapy were (78.9 vs 80.5, p<0.001), with each one-year increase in age corresponding to a 7% reduction in likelihood of receiving invasive treatment (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.91–0.96). Crude 30-day mortality was significantly lower in the overall invasively managed population (5.4% vs 13.1%, p<0.001). After multivariable logistic adjustment for demographic and clinical features, early PCI was associated with lower mortality (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.30–0.76). No significant differences in outcomes were observed between sexes (interaction, p=0.54) or by the presence of diabetes mellitus (interaction, p=0.61). In addition, no differences were seen among age groups (75–79 vs 80–84, interaction p=0.47; group 80–84 vs ≥85, interaction p=0.69). In early PCI, the group between 75–79 years had 5 (1.6%) major and 5 (1.6%) minor bleeding complications whereas the older groups had 1 (1.1%) and 1 (2.7%) major and 3 (3.2%) and 2 (5.4%) minor bleeding complications for patients aged 80–84 and ≥85, respectively. Conclusions In the real-life clinical setting, early PCI is a safe and efficacious treatment option in very elderly patients presenting with NSTE-ACS. Revascularization is better than medical therapy whatever the age is.

Percutaneous coronary intervention in the age of frailty

Bergami, M;Manfrini, O;Cenko, E;Scarpone, M;Bugiardini, R
2019

Abstract

Background Although guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology and American Heart Association/American College of Cardiology recommend early percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in all patients with non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction/ unstable angina (NSTE-ACS), in day-to-day practice persists uncertainty as to whether to follow guidelines in patients aged 75 years or older. Indeed, recommendations are based on large randomized trials where patients aged 75 years or older are under-represented. Purpose We aimed to investigate whether patients aged 75 years or older would benefit from an early invasive strategy versus a conservative strategy. We also analyzed the factors associated with the choice of an early PCI in this population. Methods The research was conducted on the population of the International Survey of Acute Coronary Syndromes (ISACS-TC) registry. The study population consisted of 6826 eligible patients with NSTE-ACS. Of these patients, 1496 were 75 years old or older and were included in the analysis. The primary outcome measure was 30-day mortality. Key secondary outcomes were bleeding complications during the index hospitalization. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to establish outcomes and factors associated with outcomes. We evaluated specific ranges of ages: 75–79 years, 80–84 years, and 85 years or over. Further, data were sorted by sex and diabetes mellitus status. Results The mean age of our study population was 80.0 (interquartile range: 77–82) years old. Elderly patients treated with early PCI and medical therapy were significantly younger than those treated with only medical therapy were (78.9 vs 80.5, p<0.001), with each one-year increase in age corresponding to a 7% reduction in likelihood of receiving invasive treatment (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.91–0.96). Crude 30-day mortality was significantly lower in the overall invasively managed population (5.4% vs 13.1%, p<0.001). After multivariable logistic adjustment for demographic and clinical features, early PCI was associated with lower mortality (OR 0.47, 95% CI 0.30–0.76). No significant differences in outcomes were observed between sexes (interaction, p=0.54) or by the presence of diabetes mellitus (interaction, p=0.61). In addition, no differences were seen among age groups (75–79 vs 80–84, interaction p=0.47; group 80–84 vs ≥85, interaction p=0.69). In early PCI, the group between 75–79 years had 5 (1.6%) major and 5 (1.6%) minor bleeding complications whereas the older groups had 1 (1.1%) and 1 (2.7%) major and 3 (3.2%) and 2 (5.4%) minor bleeding complications for patients aged 80–84 and ≥85, respectively. Conclusions In the real-life clinical setting, early PCI is a safe and efficacious treatment option in very elderly patients presenting with NSTE-ACS. Revascularization is better than medical therapy whatever the age is.
Bergami, M; Manfrini, O; Cenko, E; Kedev, S; Vavlukis, M; Vasiljevic, Z; Zdravkovic, M; Scarpone, M; Milicic, D; Badimon, L; Bugiardini, R
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/721054
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