Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the ultra sonographic (US) diffuse honeycomb pattern (HCP) of the spleen and a pathological diagnosis in cats, and to assess the influence of transducer type on HCP visualisation. Methods: Abdominal ultrasounds of cats with an HCP were reviewed and splenic size, shape, margination, other parenchymal alterations and splenic hilar lymphadenopathy were recorded. When applicable, images acquired with high-frequency linear and curvilinear transducers were compared to determine if an HCP was more frequently demonstrated on high-resolution images. A retrospective review of the corresponding splenic cyto histopathological samples was also performed. Results: Thirty-three cats met the inclusion criteria. Five cases were diagnosed by histology and 28 by cytology, confirmed by PCR for antigen receptor rearrangements (PARR) in uncertain cases. There were 15 cases of lymphoid hyperplasia, eight cases of lymphoma (four B cell, three T cell and one large granular lymphocytes), six cats with splenitis, three with extramedullary haematopoiesis and one with histiocytic sarcoma. The prevalence of lymphoma in cats with an HCP of the spleen was 24%. Splenomegaly was the most frequent US feature associated with an HCP and was observed in all lymphoma cases. In the images obtained from both high-frequency linear and micro-convex transducers the visualisation of an HCP was enabled in all cases (24/24) and in 62.5% (15/24), respectively. Conclusions and relevance: Based on our findings, an US HCP of the spleen in cats can be associated with benign and malignant disorders and is infrequently associated with lymphoma in comparison with dogs. Cytological or histological examination, possibly supplemented by PARR, should always be performed for diagnostic support. Use of high-frequency linear transducers is recommended to properly recognise an HCP or subtle changes in splenic parenchyma.

Ultrasonographic honeycomb pattern of the spleen in cats: correlation with pathological diagnosis in 33 cases

Quinci M.;Sabattini S.;Agnoli C.;Bettini G.;Diana A.
2020

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the ultra sonographic (US) diffuse honeycomb pattern (HCP) of the spleen and a pathological diagnosis in cats, and to assess the influence of transducer type on HCP visualisation. Methods: Abdominal ultrasounds of cats with an HCP were reviewed and splenic size, shape, margination, other parenchymal alterations and splenic hilar lymphadenopathy were recorded. When applicable, images acquired with high-frequency linear and curvilinear transducers were compared to determine if an HCP was more frequently demonstrated on high-resolution images. A retrospective review of the corresponding splenic cyto histopathological samples was also performed. Results: Thirty-three cats met the inclusion criteria. Five cases were diagnosed by histology and 28 by cytology, confirmed by PCR for antigen receptor rearrangements (PARR) in uncertain cases. There were 15 cases of lymphoid hyperplasia, eight cases of lymphoma (four B cell, three T cell and one large granular lymphocytes), six cats with splenitis, three with extramedullary haematopoiesis and one with histiocytic sarcoma. The prevalence of lymphoma in cats with an HCP of the spleen was 24%. Splenomegaly was the most frequent US feature associated with an HCP and was observed in all lymphoma cases. In the images obtained from both high-frequency linear and micro-convex transducers the visualisation of an HCP was enabled in all cases (24/24) and in 62.5% (15/24), respectively. Conclusions and relevance: Based on our findings, an US HCP of the spleen in cats can be associated with benign and malignant disorders and is infrequently associated with lymphoma in comparison with dogs. Cytological or histological examination, possibly supplemented by PARR, should always be performed for diagnostic support. Use of high-frequency linear transducers is recommended to properly recognise an HCP or subtle changes in splenic parenchyma.
Quinci M.; Sabattini S.; Agnoli C.; Bettini G.; Diana A.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/720664
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