Background: An aging population combined with an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence in the older population will increase its prevalence in the elderly, questioning how many years of life are lost (YLLs) in these patients. Patients and methods: Data from 32,568 Dutch CRC patients ≥ 80 years were used to estimate the number of YLLs after diagnosis, using a reference age-, sex- and year-of-onset-matched cohort derived from national life tables. YLLs were additionally adjusted by comorbidities. Number needed to treat (NNT) was used as measure of surgical effect size. Results: Surgery was applied in 74.9% of patients leading to 1.3 YLLs, being superior in 86.1% of cases with respect to alternative therapies (YLLs 4.8 years) and resulting in a number of two patients needed to operate to achieve one positive outcome. YLLs and NNTs depended on CRC stage, patient’ age and comorbidities. For Stage I–II patients in the best clinical conditions (80–85 years without comorbidities), YLLs increased up to 4.1 years after surgery and up to 8.8 years without surgery (NNT 3). For Stage III patients, the NNT of surgery varied between 2 when they were in the best clinical conditions and 4 when they were older with high comorbidities. In Stage IV patients, the NNT ranged between 6 and 31. Conclusions: YLLs represents a novel approach to evaluate CRC prognosis. Stage I–III surgical patients can have a life expectancy similar to that of general population, being the NNT of surgery reasonably small compared with alternatives. Personalized comorbidity data are needed to confirm present findings.

Years of Life Lost for Older Patients After Colorectal Cancer Diagnosis

Mazzotti F.;Cucchetti A.;Ercolani G.;
2019

Abstract

Background: An aging population combined with an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence in the older population will increase its prevalence in the elderly, questioning how many years of life are lost (YLLs) in these patients. Patients and methods: Data from 32,568 Dutch CRC patients ≥ 80 years were used to estimate the number of YLLs after diagnosis, using a reference age-, sex- and year-of-onset-matched cohort derived from national life tables. YLLs were additionally adjusted by comorbidities. Number needed to treat (NNT) was used as measure of surgical effect size. Results: Surgery was applied in 74.9% of patients leading to 1.3 YLLs, being superior in 86.1% of cases with respect to alternative therapies (YLLs 4.8 years) and resulting in a number of two patients needed to operate to achieve one positive outcome. YLLs and NNTs depended on CRC stage, patient’ age and comorbidities. For Stage I–II patients in the best clinical conditions (80–85 years without comorbidities), YLLs increased up to 4.1 years after surgery and up to 8.8 years without surgery (NNT 3). For Stage III patients, the NNT of surgery varied between 2 when they were in the best clinical conditions and 4 when they were older with high comorbidities. In Stage IV patients, the NNT ranged between 6 and 31. Conclusions: YLLs represents a novel approach to evaluate CRC prognosis. Stage I–III surgical patients can have a life expectancy similar to that of general population, being the NNT of surgery reasonably small compared with alternatives. Personalized comorbidity data are needed to confirm present findings.
Mazzotti F.; Cucchetti A.; Claassen Y.H.M.; Bos A.C.R.K.; Bastiaannet E.; Ercolani G.; Dekker J.W.T.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/715160
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