Since 2008, the kiwifruit industry has been devastated by a pandemic outbreak of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa), the causal agent of bacterial canker. This disease has become the most significant limiting factor in kiwifruit production. Psa colonizes different organs of the host plant, causing a specific symptomatology on each of them. In addition, the systemic invasion of the plant may quickly lead to plant death. Despite the massive risk that this disease poses to the kiwifruit industry, studies focusing on Psa ecology have been sporadic, and a comprehensive description of the disease epidemiology is still missing. Optimal environmental conditions for infection, dispersal and survival in the environment, or the mechanisms of penetration and colonization of host tissues have not been fully elucidated yet. The present work aims to provide a synthesis of the current knowledge, and a deeper understanding of the epidemiology of kiwifruit bacterial canker based on new experimental data. The pathogen may survive in the environment or overwinter in dormant tissues and be dispersed by wind or rain. Psa was observed in association with several plant structures (stomata, trichomes, lenticels) and wounds, which could represent entry points for apoplast infection. Environmental conditions also affect the bacterial colonization, with lower optimum values of temperature and humidity for epiphytic than for endophytic growth, and disease incidence requiring a combination of mild temperature and leaf wetness. By providing information on Psa ecology, these data sets may contribute to plan efficient control strategies for kiwifruit bacterial canker.

Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae: Ecology, Infection Dynamics and Disease Epidemiology

Donati I.;Cellini A.;Sangiorgio D.;Spinelli F.
2020

Abstract

Since 2008, the kiwifruit industry has been devastated by a pandemic outbreak of Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae (Psa), the causal agent of bacterial canker. This disease has become the most significant limiting factor in kiwifruit production. Psa colonizes different organs of the host plant, causing a specific symptomatology on each of them. In addition, the systemic invasion of the plant may quickly lead to plant death. Despite the massive risk that this disease poses to the kiwifruit industry, studies focusing on Psa ecology have been sporadic, and a comprehensive description of the disease epidemiology is still missing. Optimal environmental conditions for infection, dispersal and survival in the environment, or the mechanisms of penetration and colonization of host tissues have not been fully elucidated yet. The present work aims to provide a synthesis of the current knowledge, and a deeper understanding of the epidemiology of kiwifruit bacterial canker based on new experimental data. The pathogen may survive in the environment or overwinter in dormant tissues and be dispersed by wind or rain. Psa was observed in association with several plant structures (stomata, trichomes, lenticels) and wounds, which could represent entry points for apoplast infection. Environmental conditions also affect the bacterial colonization, with lower optimum values of temperature and humidity for epiphytic than for endophytic growth, and disease incidence requiring a combination of mild temperature and leaf wetness. By providing information on Psa ecology, these data sets may contribute to plan efficient control strategies for kiwifruit bacterial canker.
Donati I.; Cellini A.; Sangiorgio D.; Vanneste J.L.; Scortichini M.; Balestra G.M.; Spinelli F.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/714284
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