Combating hate speech is one facet of an arduous and complex process and it is only through concrete actions that we can hope for a more just, more humane, and more inclusive society. Examples of intolerance, misogyny, homophobia, racism, sexism, marginalisation, discrimination are unfortunately all too common and we need to start by examining our own practices to ensure that these are truly in line with the values that we uphold. Addressing hate discourse needs to be an onlife collective effort, bringing together consumers and content-producers, be they politicians, journalists, educators, parents, or children - everyone has a role to play. Everyone has a responsibility to shoulder by being attentive, critical, curious, eager to explore different perspectives, refusing a stereotyped view of reality. This is an uncomfortable but necessary stance, refusing the simplification of what is naturally complex. From an economic point of view, Taleb (2018) calls for more artisans. Artisans are true to their craft and they will not take any shortcuts for profit. He describes how artisans put “their soul in the game”, putting art in their profession as they create things “for existential reasons”. This posture, as Taleb calls it, is uncomfortable. Artisans will never jeopardise their craft, and they consciously choose to create things with and of value. Artisans have unwavering principles and integrity. They are authentic and in love with what they do. The paper offers a reflection about the need for teachers and educational practicioners to keep and educate to a "artisan posture" in consuming and producing media content.

Prevention of hate in migration discourse: the need for an artisan’s posture

Soriani Alessandro
;
2019

Abstract

Combating hate speech is one facet of an arduous and complex process and it is only through concrete actions that we can hope for a more just, more humane, and more inclusive society. Examples of intolerance, misogyny, homophobia, racism, sexism, marginalisation, discrimination are unfortunately all too common and we need to start by examining our own practices to ensure that these are truly in line with the values that we uphold. Addressing hate discourse needs to be an onlife collective effort, bringing together consumers and content-producers, be they politicians, journalists, educators, parents, or children - everyone has a role to play. Everyone has a responsibility to shoulder by being attentive, critical, curious, eager to explore different perspectives, refusing a stereotyped view of reality. This is an uncomfortable but necessary stance, refusing the simplification of what is naturally complex. From an economic point of view, Taleb (2018) calls for more artisans. Artisans are true to their craft and they will not take any shortcuts for profit. He describes how artisans put “their soul in the game”, putting art in their profession as they create things “for existential reasons”. This posture, as Taleb calls it, is uncomfortable. Artisans will never jeopardise their craft, and they consciously choose to create things with and of value. Artisans have unwavering principles and integrity. They are authentic and in love with what they do. The paper offers a reflection about the need for teachers and educational practicioners to keep and educate to a "artisan posture" in consuming and producing media content.
Soriani Alessandro, Charlot Cassar
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/709022
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