In routine diagnostic activity, pathologists may be confronted with nervous system tumors. The lack of clinical information, economic restrictions for additional testing, and the lack of expertise in neuropathology may render the diagnosis challenging. The goals of this study were to assess the agreement in diagnosing nervous system tumors in domestic carnivores among 4 board-certified surgical pathologists without particular expertise in neuropathology and a neuropathologist expert, and to investigate the utility of special stains frequently used in routine diagnostic laboratories. Forty-six tumors (7 cats, 38 dogs, and 1 unknown carnivore) were retrieved and 1 hematoxylin and eosin-stained slide per tumor was selected. Diagnoses (tumor type and subtype) were formulated based on histological features and available clinical information. Confidence in the diagnosis was also scored. Subsequently, a panel of histochemical and immunohistochemical stains (Gordon Sweet silver stain and immunohistochemistry for AE1/AE3, vimentin, glial fibrillary acid protein, S100, neuron-specific enolase and neurofilament) was evaluated by the pathologists, who either confirmed or changed their original diagnoses. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement and confidence in relation to diagnosis before and after analysis of special stains were assessed. The use of special stains increased the complete agreement among surgical pathologists, with regard to tumor type, from 63% to 74%. Cases with a high confidence score had a higher interobserver agreement than cases with a low confidence score. These results suggest that pathologists without expertise in neuropathology agree in the diagnosis of most nervous system tumors, and special stains available in most laboratories only slightly increase this agreement.

Inter- and Intraobserver Agreement of Canine and Feline Nervous System Tumors

Avallone G.
Investigation
;
Di Palma S.
Investigation
;
2019

Abstract

In routine diagnostic activity, pathologists may be confronted with nervous system tumors. The lack of clinical information, economic restrictions for additional testing, and the lack of expertise in neuropathology may render the diagnosis challenging. The goals of this study were to assess the agreement in diagnosing nervous system tumors in domestic carnivores among 4 board-certified surgical pathologists without particular expertise in neuropathology and a neuropathologist expert, and to investigate the utility of special stains frequently used in routine diagnostic laboratories. Forty-six tumors (7 cats, 38 dogs, and 1 unknown carnivore) were retrieved and 1 hematoxylin and eosin-stained slide per tumor was selected. Diagnoses (tumor type and subtype) were formulated based on histological features and available clinical information. Confidence in the diagnosis was also scored. Subsequently, a panel of histochemical and immunohistochemical stains (Gordon Sweet silver stain and immunohistochemistry for AE1/AE3, vimentin, glial fibrillary acid protein, S100, neuron-specific enolase and neurofilament) was evaluated by the pathologists, who either confirmed or changed their original diagnoses. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement and confidence in relation to diagnosis before and after analysis of special stains were assessed. The use of special stains increased the complete agreement among surgical pathologists, with regard to tumor type, from 63% to 74%. Cases with a high confidence score had a higher interobserver agreement than cases with a low confidence score. These results suggest that pathologists without expertise in neuropathology agree in the diagnosis of most nervous system tumors, and special stains available in most laboratories only slightly increase this agreement.
Belluco S.; Avallone G.; Di Palma S.; Rasotto R.; Oevermann A.
File in questo prodotto:
Eventuali allegati, non sono esposti

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11585/702238
 Attenzione

Attenzione! I dati visualizzati non sono stati sottoposti a validazione da parte dell'ateneo

Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 1
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 3
social impact