Only a limited amount of data is available on the demographic and socio-economic status of psoriasis patients and its correlation with disease severity and impact on quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the socio-economic status of psoriasis patients is associated with higher PASI (Psoriasis Area Severity Index) and DLQI (Dermatology Life Quality Index) scores and global severity of disease. A total of 300 adults with plaque psoriasis, attending our psoriasis clinic for the first time (January 2015 to April 2018), were included in the study. Severity of psoriasis was defined according to three different definitions: PASI > 10, DLQI >10, and global severity based on the "Rule of tens" > 10%. The three outcomes were compared between patients with mild psoriasis and those with moderate-to-severe psoriasis using the t-test and χ2-test. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between each of the three outcomes and clinical and socio-economic features. Patients with lower educational level, employed in manual or office work, and with lower income were more likely to have moderate-to-severe psoriasis, considering the PASI and DLQI scores separately and the global severity of disease. The association between severity of disease and income was also significant based on multiple regression models. This study confirms the negative association between psoriasis severity and socio-economic status and is aimed at raising awareness among health professionals to investigate and consider this aspect in the management and therapeutic decisions in affected patients.

Socio-economic status and severity of plaque psoriasis: a cross-sectional study in the metropolitan city of Bologna

Tengattini, Vera;Rucci, Paola;Iommi, Marica;Sacchelli, Lidia;Patrizi, Annalisa;Filippi, Federica
2019

Abstract

Only a limited amount of data is available on the demographic and socio-economic status of psoriasis patients and its correlation with disease severity and impact on quality of life. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the socio-economic status of psoriasis patients is associated with higher PASI (Psoriasis Area Severity Index) and DLQI (Dermatology Life Quality Index) scores and global severity of disease. A total of 300 adults with plaque psoriasis, attending our psoriasis clinic for the first time (January 2015 to April 2018), were included in the study. Severity of psoriasis was defined according to three different definitions: PASI > 10, DLQI >10, and global severity based on the "Rule of tens" > 10%. The three outcomes were compared between patients with mild psoriasis and those with moderate-to-severe psoriasis using the t-test and χ2-test. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to evaluate the association between each of the three outcomes and clinical and socio-economic features. Patients with lower educational level, employed in manual or office work, and with lower income were more likely to have moderate-to-severe psoriasis, considering the PASI and DLQI scores separately and the global severity of disease. The association between severity of disease and income was also significant based on multiple regression models. This study confirms the negative association between psoriasis severity and socio-economic status and is aimed at raising awareness among health professionals to investigate and consider this aspect in the management and therapeutic decisions in affected patients.
Bardazzi, Federico; Tengattini, Vera; Rucci, Paola; Iommi, Marica; Sacchelli, Lidia; Patrizi, Annalisa; Filippi, Federica
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/687462
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