Compost can provide nitrogen (N) and especially phosphorous (P) available for plant growth, thus representing a potential alternative to chemical P-fertilizers a non-renewable resource. However, little is known about their residual capacity to provide plant-available P. In this study four compost: a green waste compost (GWC), one from anaerobically-digested bio-waste (DC), one from sewage sludge (SSC), and one from bio-waste (BWC), were compared (10 and 20 Mg VS ha−1) in a ryegrass pot test (112 days), for their N- and P-relative mineral fertilizer equivalence (MFE; %) vs. a chemical fertilizer (NPK). After the test period, the exploited treatments were tested for their MFE during an additional ryegrass growth cycle (112 days) in an N-rich environment (N+). After 112 days, the pot test showed that DC and SSC produced dry biomass in the same range as did NPK, attaining the best N-MFE (80–100%) and P-MFE (100–125%), whereas GWC and BWC performed poorly (60–80 and 80–90%; N-MFE and P-MFE). At the end of the first growth cycle, DC and SSC still showed relevant Olsen-P (20–30 mg kg−1). This was reflected in the best ryegrass P-MFE in DC and SSC at the end of the second growth cycle (N+), after 224 days (100–110%), whereas BWC and GWC poorly performed (90–95%). DC and SSC may therefore represent valuable sources of N available for plant nutrition in the short term, and also represent medium-term valuable P sources, alternative to rock phosphate P fertilizers. This promising approach need further field-scale investigation to confirm the medium-long term capacity of composts to be alternative to rock phosphate P fertilizers.

Current and residual phosphorous availability from compost in a ryegrass pot test

Grigatti Marco;Cavani Luciano;Di Biase Giampaolo;Ciavatta Claudio
2019

Abstract

Compost can provide nitrogen (N) and especially phosphorous (P) available for plant growth, thus representing a potential alternative to chemical P-fertilizers a non-renewable resource. However, little is known about their residual capacity to provide plant-available P. In this study four compost: a green waste compost (GWC), one from anaerobically-digested bio-waste (DC), one from sewage sludge (SSC), and one from bio-waste (BWC), were compared (10 and 20 Mg VS ha−1) in a ryegrass pot test (112 days), for their N- and P-relative mineral fertilizer equivalence (MFE; %) vs. a chemical fertilizer (NPK). After the test period, the exploited treatments were tested for their MFE during an additional ryegrass growth cycle (112 days) in an N-rich environment (N+). After 112 days, the pot test showed that DC and SSC produced dry biomass in the same range as did NPK, attaining the best N-MFE (80–100%) and P-MFE (100–125%), whereas GWC and BWC performed poorly (60–80 and 80–90%; N-MFE and P-MFE). At the end of the first growth cycle, DC and SSC still showed relevant Olsen-P (20–30 mg kg−1). This was reflected in the best ryegrass P-MFE in DC and SSC at the end of the second growth cycle (N+), after 224 days (100–110%), whereas BWC and GWC poorly performed (90–95%). DC and SSC may therefore represent valuable sources of N available for plant nutrition in the short term, and also represent medium-term valuable P sources, alternative to rock phosphate P fertilizers. This promising approach need further field-scale investigation to confirm the medium-long term capacity of composts to be alternative to rock phosphate P fertilizers.
2019
Grigatti Marco; Cavani Luciano; Di Biase Giampaolo; Ciavatta Claudio
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/685916
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