Background: Signs and symptoms of impaired function of the musculoskeletal system may be targeted by treating dysfunction located elsewhere. Hypothesis: Abdominal control feedback and scapular stabilization exercise interventions would result in positive changes in pain intensity, strength, electromyography, and flexion-relaxation phenomena in women with forward head and round shoulder postures and neck movement impairment. Study Design: Pretest-posttest intervention. Level of Evidence: Level 1. Methods: A total of 135 women (aged 27.23 ± 1.9 years) with forward head and round shoulder postures were randomized to 3 groups. Group 1 received 6-week scapular stabilization exercises with abdominal control feedback (n = 45), group 2 received 6-week scapular stabilization exercises without abdominal control feedback (n = 45), and group 3 received active self-exercise as a control group (n = 45). Posture, pain, proprioception, strength, and electromyography were assessed before and after the interventions. Results: There were significant between-group differences in pain, proprioception, strength, and electromyography favoring group 1. There were significant within-group changes in posture, pain, proprioception, strength, and electromyography in both groups 1 and 2. No significant change was observed for muscle strength. Conclusion: The addition of abdominal control feedback to the scapular stabilization exercises was shown to be superior to the scapular stabilization exercises alone for decreasing neck pain and restoring proper proprioception, strength, and electromyography in females with forward head and round shoulder postures and neck movement impairment. Clinical Relevance: The addition of abdominal control feedback to scapular stabilization exercises is superior to scapular stabilization exercises alone on the neck for improving electromyography, strength, and function in females with forward head and round shoulder postures and neck movement impairment.

Efficacy of Abdominal Control Feedback and Scapula Stabilization Exercises in Participants With Forward Head, Round Shoulder Postures and Neck Movement Impairment

Paolo, Pillastrini;
2019

Abstract

Background: Signs and symptoms of impaired function of the musculoskeletal system may be targeted by treating dysfunction located elsewhere. Hypothesis: Abdominal control feedback and scapular stabilization exercise interventions would result in positive changes in pain intensity, strength, electromyography, and flexion-relaxation phenomena in women with forward head and round shoulder postures and neck movement impairment. Study Design: Pretest-posttest intervention. Level of Evidence: Level 1. Methods: A total of 135 women (aged 27.23 ± 1.9 years) with forward head and round shoulder postures were randomized to 3 groups. Group 1 received 6-week scapular stabilization exercises with abdominal control feedback (n = 45), group 2 received 6-week scapular stabilization exercises without abdominal control feedback (n = 45), and group 3 received active self-exercise as a control group (n = 45). Posture, pain, proprioception, strength, and electromyography were assessed before and after the interventions. Results: There were significant between-group differences in pain, proprioception, strength, and electromyography favoring group 1. There were significant within-group changes in posture, pain, proprioception, strength, and electromyography in both groups 1 and 2. No significant change was observed for muscle strength. Conclusion: The addition of abdominal control feedback to the scapular stabilization exercises was shown to be superior to the scapular stabilization exercises alone for decreasing neck pain and restoring proper proprioception, strength, and electromyography in females with forward head and round shoulder postures and neck movement impairment. Clinical Relevance: The addition of abdominal control feedback to scapular stabilization exercises is superior to scapular stabilization exercises alone on the neck for improving electromyography, strength, and function in females with forward head and round shoulder postures and neck movement impairment.
2019
Shiravi, Shirin; Letafatkar, Amir; Bertozzi, Lucia; Paolo, Pillastrini; Khaleghi Tazji, Mehdi
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11585/685378
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